Analysis Shows Eggs Contain More Vitamin D

 

UK – Official new data shows that today’s eggs contain more than 70 per cent more vitamin D and double the amount of selenium than when previous analyses were carried out 30 years ago.

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Vitamina D – Sem Censura – Dr. Cicero Galli Coimbra e Daniel Cunha

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIwIWim4hNM&list=UU5grjCGNi25VAR8J0eVuxVQ&index=1&feature=plcp

Vitamina D – por uma outra terapia

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/vitamina-d-por-uma-outra-terapia/

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Friday, July 20, 2012

UK – Official new data shows that today’s eggs contain more than 70 per cent more vitamin D and double the amount of selenium than when previous analyses were carried out 30 years ago.

Today’s eggs also contain around 20 per cent less fat, more than 20 per cent less saturated fat, around 13 per cent fewer calories and more than 10 per cent less cholesterol than previous surveys suggested. An average medium egg now contains 66 calories (compared to the previous figure of 78 calories) and an average large egg 77 calories (previously 91 calories).

The data, produced by the UK Foodcomp project consortium, funded by the Department of Health as part of their rolling programme of nutrient analysis surveys, provides the first update on the nutrient content of eggs since the 1980s.

Professor Judith Buttriss, Director General of the BNF, explained: “This is the latest in a series of analyses from the DH-funded UK Foodcomp project that provide up to date information on the composition of the food we eat. These particular data reinforce the contribution to essential nutrients that eggs can make as part of a varied diet, for people of all ages.”

The new analysis, part of which is being presented at The Nutrition Society’s Summer Meeting on 18 July, found that two medium eggs can provide around two-thirds of the RDA (Recommended Daily Amount for EU labelling purposes) for vitamin D. The additional vitamin D found in eggs is particularly significant in the light of evidence suggesting that a large proportion of people in the UK have an inadequate supply of this vitamin.

It has been suggested that, in addition to the well-established role of vitamin D in bone health, this nutrient may also play a role in the immune system and beneficially influence the incidence of some cancers, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

“This is a very welcome finding at a time when there is rapidly accumulating evidence that a lack of vitamin D could be a risk factor for a number of chronic diseases,” says Cath MacDonald, independent nutritionist.

The increased selenium content of eggs is also of public health significance as UK selenium intakes have declined in recent years alongside a switch from North American to European wheat[4]. Selenium is important in protecting cellular components such as DNA, lipids and proteins against oxidation.

The new analyses reveal that an average medium egg now contains around 177mg of cholesterol, although it is now acknowledged that cholesterol in foods such as eggs does not have a significant effect on blood cholesterol in most people. All major UK heart and health advisory bodies, including the British Heart Foundation, have already removed the previous limits on egg consumption linked to their cholesterol content.

The changes are believed to be the result of improvements to hens’ feed, an increase in the ratio of white:yolk in an average egg, and improved analytical methods since the last official Government analyses were carried out in the 1980s. Vegetable oils replaced meat and bonemeal in UK hens’ feed in the 1980s and it is believed that better quality oils, together with other enhancements to hens’ feed, have improved the hens’ absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and the take-up of nutrients.

Paul Finglas, coordinator of the UK Foodcomp project at the Institute of Food Research, said: “The results from this project are important for monitoring the quality of our national diets through surveys such as the Department of Health’s National Diet and Nutrition Survey, and show the benefits of private:public partnerships working together to support new research projects.”

For a table summarising the update on the nutrient content of eggs, please click here.

TheMeatSite News Desk

http://www.themeatsite.com/meatnews/18425/new-analysis-shows-eggs-contain-more-vitamin-d

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Vitamina D x Câncer – Vitamin D Revealed to be Miracle Anti-Cancer ‘Drug’ with Astonishing Chemical Properties

English: pink ribbon

Vitamina D – Sem Censura – Dr. Cicero Galli Coimbra e Daniel Cunha

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIwIWim4hNM&list=UU5grjCGNi25VAR8J0eVuxVQ&index=1&feature=plcp

Vitamina D – por uma outra terapia

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/vitamina-d-por-uma-outra-terapia/

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By Natural News | July 27, 2012 4:48 PM EST

A new study published this month finds that the hormonally active form of vitamin D, Calcitriol 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), inhibits the growth of many kinds of cancerous cells, including breast cancer, indicating that vitamin D3 can be useful in treating and even preventing a variety of cancers. Authors of the study said that caner cell growth is inhibited by “anticancer actions including cell cycle arrest, promotion of apoptosis and inhibition of invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis.” Vitamin D’s anti-inflammatory properties and interference with estrogen synthesis further explains its anti-tumor properties.

Two studies from 2007 used meta-analysis, which combines data from multiple reports, to find that therapeutic doses of vitamin D could prevent up to half of all cases of breast cancer, and two-thirds of all cases of colorectal cancer in the United States. The studies showed a direct correlation between blood levels of vitamin D and cancer. Those with the highest blood levels were found to be at the lowest risk, and the lowest blood levels at the highest risk.

Many sources still try to cast a shadow on the effectiveness of vitamin D, citing that a specific dose strength has not yet been established, and needs more research. It likely won’t be narrowed down to a one-size-fits-all dose, because every body is different, and if it were, it wouldn’t be as effective. One other thing that may be giving varied results regarding dosing is the source of vitamin D used – it varies from study to study. Typically, higher doses are required of synthetic sources to increase blood levels, and they don’t generally have the same effect as natural sources.

The “sunshine” vitamin, vitamin D is fat-soluble vitamin required for the absorption and utilization of calcium and phosphorous. It protects against muscle weakness, regulates heartbeat, is necessary for normal blood clotting and thyroid function, and regulates more than 2,000 genes, affecting the proliferation and death of cells.

Vitamin D comes in several forms. The kind that comes from food is D2. There is a synthetic form, D5. The most active is the most natural kind, D3. It is synthesized in the skin in response to the sun’s ultraviolet rays. There is a cholesterol compound in the skin that is a precursor of vitamin D. The D we get from food and supplements is not fully active until it goes through the liver and kidneys, where it is converted, then it circulates through the blood like a hormone.

According to Bach, problems from deficiency may include: heart disease, birth defects, depression, hypertension, stroke, dementia, fibromyalgia, impaired bone mineralization, skin, breast, prostate and other cancers, multiple sclerosis, insomnia, eye problems, problems with pregnancy, and other chronic diseases. It is estimated that more than one billion people worldwide, and 77 percent of Americans, are deficient in vitamin D.

It is not possible for most people to consume enough vitamin D thorough diet alone. It is found in fatty saltwater fish and fish liver oils, such as halibut, salmon, sardines, and cod liver oil. It is also added (fortified) to diary and eggs, so you’ll find it in things like milk, yogurt, and butter. Other foods that have vitamin D include dandelion greens, oatmeal, cereals, and sweet potatoes.

Having a healthy and balanced diet can prevent cancer, and the need for prescriptions that contribute to cancer, such as cholesterol reducing drugs that inhibit vitamin D absorption from the sun. Even the National Cancer Institute estimates that 80 percent of cancer cases could be prevented. Most people supplement to get enough vitamin D. The recommended doses are generally not enough to address health problems. Be sure your supplements come from whole food vitamins so that higher doses won’t be detrimental to your health, as they might from synthetic vitamin sources.

Eating good food, limiting unhealthy food and substances, getting exercise, and soaking up a bit of sun are critical to happiness and lasting health. So get out there and have fun – and help prevent cancer while you’re at it!

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/036597_vitamin_D_anti-cancer_drug.html#ixzz21pJmcwXF
Fonte: http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/367433/20120727/vitamin-d-revealed-miracle-anti-cancer-drug.htm#.UBSCR9WwWAg

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