Vitamin D, ex-chefe do CDC: risco de infecção por coronavírus pode ser reduzido pela vitamina D – Former CDC Chief Dr. Tom Frieden: Coronavirus infection risk may be reduced by Vitamin D

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O ALERTA DE SAÚDE PÚBLICA ERA OBRIGATÓRIO ANTES DO CARNAVAL

No Brasil, Passou o Carnaval sem antes haver alertas imperativos das autoridades da saúde de risco à saúde pública.

Médicos que alertaram sobre esse risco foram censurados.

O óbvio aconteceu, e somente começou a ser noticiado, assim que, não casualmente, terminou o Carnaval. O Coronavírus chegara no Brasil. Dentro do contexto negligente de controle de informações, apenas se noticiou pessoas infectadas que “teriam viajado para o exterior”, não se noticiou o óbvio: milhares de pessoas que viajaram do exterior para o Brasil para participar do Carnaval.

Impossível não ter sido essa a enorme “porta de entrada” desse vírus no Brasil. Total negligência do Poder Público, que somente pensou em seus interesses políticos de forma inquestionável neste País.

Agora, é imperativo que esse Poder Público forneça gratuitamente para a população o único restaurador natural da imunidade inata da pessoa, que é o Hormônio Vitamina D3, especialmente diante do fato que o comando de quarentena imposta a todo o Brasil está privando a população de se expor ao Sol, que em contato com a pele humana por 10 a 30 minutos diários, é sua fonte de produção por excelência para a manutenção da vida e da saúde normais.

A junção desses aspectos, coloca as autoridades responsáveis pela saúde pública federal diante de exame do Código Penal, pela ausência de alertas sobre os riscos apresentados pelo Carnaval, somados a convocações para manifestações públicas de interesse político privado, mas que afeta todos os demais que sequer compareceram a essas manifestações, e anterior Carnaval.

A questão envolve nos casos não letais  o  Artigo 132, por colocar em risco direto e imediato a saúde de terceiros.

Celso Galli Coimbra – OABRS 11352

Parte da notícia veiculada no link:

Assista o vídeo:

Former CDC Chief Dr. Tom Frieden: Coronavirus infection risk may be reduced by Vitamin D

As we race to develop effective treatments and a vaccine against COVID-19, people are looking to reduce their risk of getting sick. One thing that might help is as obvious as the sun in the sky and as close as your medicine cabinet – Vitamin D.

Higher COVID-19 mortality rates among older people and those with chronic conditions suggest that a weakened immune system contributes to poor outcomes. There are many crackpot claims about miracle cures floating around, but the science supports the possibility – although not the proof – that Vitamin D may strengthen the immune system, particularly of people whose Vitamin D levels are low.

Vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of respiratory infectionregulates cytokine production and can limit the risk of other viruses such as influenza. A respiratory infection can result in cytokine storms – a vicious cycle in which our inflammatory cells damage organs throughout the body – which increase mortality for those with COVID-19. Adequate Vitamin D may potentially provide some modest protection for vulnerable populations.

This is especially important for people who are Vitamin D deficient – and, surprisingly, that might include more than 40 percent of US adults. People who live in the northern part of the U.S. are at greater risk of deficiency.

There is evidence of seasonality in some respiratory illnesses, including influenza and tuberculosis. A leading hypothesis is that seasonality is due to the reduction in Vitamin D because of decreased exposure to sunlight in winter months. There is no seasonality of influenza or tuberculosis in some tropical climates (such as south India), where weather – and sunlight exposure – remains more constant throughout the year.

 

When I worked in India, from 1996-2002, I requested that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) send an epidemic intelligence officer in to investigate, and Dr. Lorna Thorpe, the lead author on the resulting study, found that there was more seasonality in the northern climates, which have a cool or cold winter season, and little or none in the southern areas of the country, which are hot all year around.

Right now, we don’t know if Vitamin D deficiency plays any role in the severity of COVID-19. But given the high prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in this country, it is safe to recommend that people get the proper daily dosage of Vitamin D.

Most people’s bodies manufacture Vitamin D in the skin when exposed to the sun. About 15 minutes a day of direct sunlight is sufficient for many people’s bodies to manufacture enough Vitamin D; people with darker skin need longer exposure to sunlight to manufacture the same amount. In winter, people in northern latitudes may not be able to make any Vitamin D from sunlight. Sunscreen lengthens the exposure time needed

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amedicas

Insuficiência de Vitamina D pode causar perda de mobilidade e invalidez – Not getting enough vitamin D could cause you to lose mobility, become disabled

20/2.2011 vitamin D

20/2.2011 vitamin D (Photo credit: julochka)

Assista à entrevista sobre este assunto, em português:

 Vitamina D – Sem Censura – Dr. Cicero Galli Coimbra e Daniel Cunha

Ao vídeo:

Vitamina D – Por uma outra terapia (Vitamin D – For an alternative therapy)

Leia:

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla

“Based on data collected from the comprehensive Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study, also known as Health ABC, the new study establishes a clear connection between vitamin D levels and overall mobility and bodily function. Compiled by researchers from the Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina, the paper highlights how vitamin D levels directly affect an individual’s ability to perform everyday tasks like walking, climbing stairs, cycling, and engaging in various other forms of moderate exercise.”

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) There is no longer any doubt that regular, unfiltered sunlight exposure, which helps promote and maintain optimal blood levels of vitamin D, plays a critical role in health promotion and disease prevention. And a recent study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Science further confirms this, having found that inadequate blood levels of vitamin D can lead to decreased mobility and even disablement, particularly among the elderly.

Based on data collected from the comprehensive Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study, also known as Health ABC, the new study establishes a clear connection between vitamin D levels and overall mobility and bodily function. Compiled by researchers from the Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina, the paper highlights how vitamin D levels directly affect an individual’s ability to perform everyday tasks like walking, climbing stairs, cycling, and engaging in various other forms of moderate exercise.

More than 2,000 individuals of both Caucasian and African-American backgrounds, and with an average age of around 75-years-old, participated in the study. Researchers measured the participants’ blood serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol), a pre-hormone associated with vitamin D levels in the body, at the beginning of the study and at six-month intervals for six years, and compared these levels to overall mobility rates among the participants.

At the onset of the study, nearly 30 percent of the participants had blood levels of 25(OH)D less than 20 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL), while more than 36 percent had levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL. Only 35 percent of the group had 25(OH)D levels of 30 ng/mL, which is largely considered to be the cutoff point for determining vitamin D deficiency.

Upon evaluation, those with 25(OH)D levels below 30 ng/mL were found to be 30 percent more likely to develop mobility problems than those with higher levels, while those with 25(OH)D levels below 20 ng/mL, which is considered to be grossly deficient, were about 100 percent more likely to develop disability compared to those with higher levels.

“About one-third of older adults have low vitamin D levels,” said Denise Houston, Ph.D., R.D., a nutrition epidemiologist at the Wake Forest Baptist Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, concerning the study. “It’s difficult to get enough vitamin D through diet alone, and older adults, who may not spend much time outdoors may need to take a vitamin D supplement.”

Vitamin D deficiency even more prevalent than study shows Though the findings of the study indicate that only about a third of elderly adults have vitamin D levels above what is considered to be deficient, the Vitamin D Council says the true cutoff point for vitamin D deficiency is really about 40 ng/mL rather than 30 ng/mL — 50 ng/mL, in fact, is a more realistic cutoff point for vitamin D deficiency.

With this in mind, far more than 60 percent of the elderly are vitamin D deficient, and likely suffering from needless health and mobility issues as a result. According to the Vitamin D Council, upwards of 90 percent of humanity is vitamin D deficient.

To learn more about vitamin D, visit: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/

Sources for this article include:

http://blog.vitamindcouncil.org

http://news.nurse.com/article/20120603/NATIONAL02/106110017

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-deficiency/

Fonte: http://www.naturalnews.com/036436_vitamin_D_deficiency_mobility.html

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