Transplants and Brain Death. “L’Osservatore Romano” Has Broken the Taboo

Rome, September 7, 2008

Tradução deste artigo para o português e com mais links:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/02/01/transplantes-e-morte-cerebral-losservatore-romano-rompe-o-tabu/

Endereço desta matéria neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/31/transplants-and-brain-death-losservatore-romano-has-broken-the-taboo/

em sua publicação original:

http://chiesa.espresso.repubblica.it/articolo/206476?eng=y


“But years later, when from february 3-4, 2005, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences again met to discuss the question of the “signs of death,” the positions had been reversed. The experts present – philosophers, jurists, neurologists from various countries – found themselves in agreement in maintaining that brain death is not the death of a human being, and that the criterion of brain death, not being scientifically credible, should be abandoned.


The pope’s newspaper has called into question whether cessation of brain activity is enough to certify a death. And with this, it has reopened the discussion on taking organs from “warm cadavers” while the heart is still beating. The scholars of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences are even more critical. And, when he was a cardinal, Ratzinger…

by Sandro Magister

ROMA, September 5, 2008 – With a prominent front-page article, “L’Osservatore Romano” two days ago reopened the discussion on the criteria for establishing the death of a human person.

The article is by Lucetta Scaraffia, a professor of contemporary history at the Rome university “La Sapienza,” and a regular writer for the Vatican newspaper. The director of the press office, Fr. Federico Lombardi, clarified that the article “is not an act of the Church’s magisterium, nor a document of a pontifical organism,” and that the reflections expressed in it “are to be attributed to the author of the text, and are not binding for the Holy See.”

That’s right. “L’Osservatore Romano” acts as an official outlet of the Holy See only in the section “Our Information,” which presents the appointments, audiences, and activities of the pope. Almost all of its articles are printed without advance review by the Vatican authorities, and fall under the responsibility of the authors and the director, Professor Giovanni Maria Vian.

This does not change the fact that the article has broken a taboo, in a newspaper that is in any case “the pope’s newspaper.”

40 years ago, on August 5, 1968, the “Journal of the American Medical Association” published a document – referred to as the “Harvard report” – that established the total cessation of brain activity, instead of the stopping of the heart, as the moment of death. All of the countries of the world rapidly adopted this standard. Even the Catholic Church took the same position. In particular, with a statement in 1985 from the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and then again in 1989 with another statement from the same academy, reinforced with a speech by John Paul II. Pope Karol Wojtyla returned to the topic on later occasions, for example with an address to a world congress of the Transplantation Society, on August 29, 2000.

In this way, the Catholic Church in fact legitimated the removal of organs as universally practiced today on people at the end of life because of illness or injury: with the donor defined as dead after an “irreversible coma” has been verified, even if he is still breathing and his heart is beating.

Since then, there has been no more discussion on this point in the Church. The only voices heard have been those in line with the Harvard report. Among these standard voices was that of Cardinal Dionigi Tettamanzi, prior to the year 2000, when topics of bioethics were his bread and butter. After him, the Church authorities most often consulted on this matter have been Bishop Elio Sgreccia, until a few months ago the president of the Pontifical Academy for Life, and Cardinal Javier Lozano Barragán, president of the pontifical council for health pastoral care.

Still today, one of the most highly respected experts in the ecclesial camp, Francesco D’Agostino, professor of the philosophy of law and president emeritus of the Italian bioethics committee, fiercely defends the criteria established by the Harvard report. The doubts presented by the article in “L’Osservatore Romano” do not sway his certainty: “Lucetta Scaraffia’s thesis is present in the scientific realm, but it is distinctly in the minority.”

Beneath the surface, however, doubts are growing in the Church. From Pius XII on, the pronouncements of the hierarchy on this question have been less clear-cut than they appear. This “ambiguity” of the Church is illustrated in an entire chapter of a book published recently in Italy: “Brain death and organ transplant. A question of legal ethics,” published by Morcelliana in Brescia. The author is Paolo Becchi, professor of the philosophy of law at the universities of Genoa and Luzern, and a pupil of a Jewish thinker who dedicated concerned reflections to the question of the end of life, Hans Jonas. According to Jonas, the new definition of death established by the Harvard report was not motivated by any real scientific advancement, but rather by interests, by the need for organs for transplants.

But it is especially in the Church that critical voices are gaining strength. Since 1989, when the Pontifical Academy of Sciences took up the question, Professor Josef Seifert, rector of the International Philosophical Academy of Liechtenstein, advanced strong objections to the definition of brain death. At that conference, Seifert’s was the only dissenting voice. But years later, when from february 3-4, 2005, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences again met to discuss the question of the “signs of death,” the positions had been reversed. The experts present – philosophers, jurists, neurologists from various countries – found themselves in agreement in maintaining that brain death is not the death of a human being, and that the criterion of brain death, not being scientifically credible, should be abandoned.

This conference was a shock to the Vatican officials who subscribe to the Harvard report. Bishop Marcélo Sánchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, prevented the proceedings from being published. A substantial number of the speakers then gave their texts to an outside publisher, Rubbettino. The result was a book with the Latin title “Finis Vitae,” edited by Professor Roberto de Mattei, deputy director of the National Research Council and editor of the monthly “Radici Cristiane.” The book was published in two editions, in Italian and English. It presented eigtheen essays, half of them by scholars who had not participated in the conference of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, but shared its views. These include Professor Becchi. Among those who did speak at the conference, special mention should be made of Seifert and of the German philosopher Robert Spaemann, who is highly respected by Pope Joseph Ratzinger.

Both the twofold volume published by Rubbettino and the book by Becchi published by Morcelliana gave Lucetta Scaraffia an opening to reopen the discussion in the columns of “L’Osservatore Romano,” at the fortieth anniversary of the Harvard report.

* * *

And Benedict XVI? He has never spoken directly on this question, not even as a theologian and cardinal. But it is known how much he respects the arguments of his friend Spaemann.

At the consistory in 1991, Ratzinger gave a speech to the cardinals on the “threats against life.” And here’s how he described these threats:

“Prenatal diagnosis is used almost in routine fashion on so-called ‘at risk’ women, in order to eliminate systematically all of the fetuses that could be more or less malformed or diseased. All of those that have the good fortune of being carried to term by their mothers, but have the misfortune of being born with handicaps, run a serious risk of being killed immediately after birth, or of having food and basic care withheld.

“Later, those who are not put into an ‘irreversible’ coma by disease or injury will often be put to death to meet the demand for organ transplants, or will be used in medical experimentation as ‘warm cadavers’.

“Finally, when death seems to be near, many will be tempted to hasten this through euthanasia.”

It can be gathered from these words that Ratzinger already had strong reservations about the Harvard criteria and the practice derived from them. In his judgment, the removal of organs from donors at the end of life is often performed on people who are not yet dead, but are “put to death” for that purpose.

Furthermore, as pope, Ratzinger published the Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. At no. 476, it reads:

“Before allowing the noble act of organ donation after death, one must verify that the donor is truly dead.”

In his book, Becchi comments:

“Because there are good arguments today for maintaining that brain death does not mean the real death of the individual, the consequences in the matter of transplants could be truly explosive. And one might wonder when these will be the matter of an official statement of the Church’s position.”

__________

The article by Lucetta Scaraffia in “L’Osservatore Romano” on September 3, 2008:

I segni della morte. A quarant’anni dal rapporto di Harvard

http://www.vatican.va/news_services/or/or_quo/205q01.pdf

__________

The books:

Roberto de Mattei (ed.), Finis Vitae. Is Brain Death Still Life?”, Rubbettino, Soveria Mannelli, 2006, 336 pp., 35.00 euros.

http://www.rubbettino.it/rubbettino/public/dettaglioLibro_re.jsp?ID=3469

Paolo Becchi, “Morte cerebrale e trapianto di organi. Una questione di etica giuridica”, Morcelliana, Brescia, 2008, 198 pp.,12.50 euros.

http://www.libreriadelsanto.it/libri/9788837222406/morte-cerebrale-e-trapianto-di-organi.html

http://www.politeia-centrostudi.org/doc/SCHEDE%20LIBRI/becchi,%20morte%20cerebrale.pdf

Cartilha da Associação dos Magistrados Brasileiros para adoção de crianças

Nesta cartilha tem todas as orientações para quem quiser adotar uma criança.

No link a seguir pode ser feito seu download.

https://biodireitomedicina.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/cartilha_passo_a_passo_2008.pdf

Alternativa Espanhola protesta contra política abortista de Obama

.- O Partido Alternativa Espanhola (AES), entregou na embaixada dos EUA “uma nota de protesto” pela decisão do Presidente Barack Obama “de retirar barreiras à prática do aborto”.

Através de uma nota de imprensa, AES informou que uma representação do partido entregou à sede diplomática “uma nota de protesto pedindo que se mantenham as restrições postas em vigor pelo Presidente Ronald Reagan”.

Como se lembra, em 23 de janeiro Obama assinou uma ordem executiva levantando as restrições que por anos evitaram que o dinheiro dos contribuintes americanos fora usado para financiar a prática e promoção do aborto no mundo.

Durante oito anos, o aborto não podia ser financiado com dinheiro público graças a “Mexico City Policy”, uma iniciativa que nasceu em uma conferência de Nações Unidas realizada no México DF em 1984 durante o governo do republicano Ronald Reagan.

Entretanto, em janeiro 1993, durante a administração democrata de Bill Clinton se revogou esta proibição; mas em janeiro de 2001 George W. Bush, restabeleceu-a com a convicção de que os impostos dos cidadãos não deveriam usar-se para pagar abortos ou financiar o trabalho dos abortistas.

A decisão de Obama de financiar o aborto com dinheiro dos contribuintes gerou críticas e protestos das organizações pró-vida dentro e fora dos Estados Unidos.

http://obamagab.com/?p=18489

Anencéfalos: a Resolução 1752/2004 do CFM “permite” o tráfico de órgãos e a prática do homicídio

“A Organização Mundial da Saúde estima que um quinto dos 70.000 rins transplantados no mundo vêm do tráfico de órgãos” [3]


A Revista Newsweek de 19 de janeiro corrente [3] traz mais uma reportagem sobre tráfico de órgãos.

Poucas pessoas sabem deste tráfico porque a mídia recusou-se a noticiá-lo para não comprometer interesses dos lucros que gravitam em torno do sistema transplantador no Brasil: no ano de 2004, houve a realização de uma CPI do Tráfico de Órgãos que comprovou a existência de tráfico de órgãos dentro de hospitais brasileiros, retirando por completo o rótulo de “lenda urbana” sobre este assunto. Mais: esta CPI, com a qual colaboramos, não constatou apenas a venda de um dos órgãos vitais duplos de pessoas que continuavam vivendo, mas o homicídio de crianças e jovens para a retirada de todos os seus órgãos.

No decorrer destes acontecimentos, inclusive, o administrador de um hospital em Minas Gerais, onde havia caso de tráfico, conseguiu praticar “suicídio” com dois tiros na cabeça. A versão do suicídio com dois tiros foi aceita pelas autoridades e a razão pela qual ele morreu não foi investigada.

Foi constatado que o Brasil está entre os cinco países onde há maior incidência do tráfico de órgãos, junto com países como China e India.

Estes dados já eram denunciados pela antropóloga Nancy Scheper-Hughes da ONG http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/biotech/organswatch/

Neste espaço iremos disponibilizar todas as atas desta CPI de 2004.

Na coluna à direita desta página já pode ser consultada a categoria de links em “Tráfico de Órgãos”.

A Resolução 1752/2004 do CFM [1], quando “autorizou” os médicos a retirarem os órgãos dos anencéfalos para transplantes, procurou “oficializar” esta prática em um universo de pessoas (anencéfalas) altamente vulneráveis.

Esta Resolução do CFM tem um conteúdo homicida, pois causar a morte do anencéfalo encontra tipificação no artigo 121 do Código Penal.

Antes da reportagem da Revista Newsweek de 19 de jan. colocamos links relacionados com este assunto [2].

[1] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/anencefalia-morte-encefalica-e-o-conselho-federal-de-medicina/

[2]https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/05/transplantes-revista-dos-anestesistas-recomenda-em-editorial-realizacao-de-anestesia-geral-nos-doadores-para-que-nao-sintam-dor-durante-a-retirada-de-seus-orgaos-se-estao-mortos-para-que-a-recomend/

[2] http://www.nazioneindiana.com/2008/12/19/il-mercato-degli-organi-il-buco-nero-della-globalizzazione/

[2] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/18/a-dura-realidade-do-trafico-de-orgaos/

[2]https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/11/morte-encefalica-o-teste-da-apneia-somente-e-feito-se-houver-a-intencao-de-matar-o-paciente/

[3] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/27/trafico-de-orgaos-e-uma-realidade-comprovada-no-brasil/

Celso Galli Coimbra – OABRS 11352

Link para esta página e para a reportagem da Revista Newsweek:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/27/trafico-de-orgaos-e-uma-realidade-comprovada-no-brasil/

Leia como é fácil o desconhecimento e a “lei da selva” promoverm absurdos de análise “jurídica”:

“Nascimento de anencéfalo pode ser útil em transplantes”

http://www.conjur.com.br/2005-dez-28/nascimento_anencefalos_util_transplantes


“The World Health Organization estimates that one fifth of the 70,000 kidneys transplanted worldwide every year come from the black market.”

http://www.newsweek.com/id/178873

___

Tráfico de órgãos é uma realidade comprovada no Brasil e no exterior

A Revista Newsweek de 19 de janeiro corrente, reproduzida após estes comentários, traz mais uma reportagem sobre tráfico de órgãos.

Poucas pessoas sabem destes fatos porque a mídia recusou-se a divulgá-los para não comprometer interesses dos lucros que gravitam em torno do sistema transplantador no Brasil: no ano de 2004, houve a realização de uma CPI do Tráfico de Órgãos que comprovou a existência de tráfico de órgãos dentro de hospitais brasileiros, retirando por completo o rótulo de “lenda urbana” sobre este assunto. Mais: esta CPI, com a qual colaboramos, não constatou apenas a venda de um dos órgãos vitais duplos de pessoas que continuavam vivendo, mas o homicídio de crianças e jovens para a retirada de todos os seus órgãos. No decorrer destes acontecimentos, inclusive, o administrador de um hospital em Minas Gerais onde havia caso de tráfico conseguiu praticar “suicídio” com dois tiros na cabeça. A versão do suicídio com dois tiros foi aceita pelas autoridades e a razão pela qual ele morreu não foi investigada.

Foi constatado que o Brasil está entre os cinco países onde há maior incidência do tráfico de órgãos, junto com países como China e India.

Estes dados já eram denunciados pela antropóloga Nancy Scheper-Hughes da ONG http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/biotech/organswatch/

Neste espaço iremos disponibilizar todas as atas desta CPI. Na coluna à direita desta página pode ser consultada a categoria de links em “Tráfico de Órgãos”.

A Resolução 1752/2004 do CFM [1], quando “autorizou” os médicos a retirarem os órgãos dos anencéfalos para transplantes, procurou “oficializar” esta prática em um universo de pessoas (anencéfalas) altamente vulneráveis.

Esta Resolução do CFM tem um conteúdo homicida, pois causar a morte do anencéfalo encontra tipificação no artigo 121 do Código Penal.

Antes da reportagem da Revista Newsweek de 19 de jan. colocamos links relacionados com este assunto [2].

[1] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/anencefalia-morte-encefalica-e-o-conselho-federal-de-medicina/

[2]https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/05/transplantes-revista-dos-anestesistas-recomenda-em-editorial-realizacao-de-anestesia-geral-nos-doadores-para-que-nao-sintam-dor-durante-a-retirada-de-seus-orgaos-se-estao-mortos-para-que-a-recomend/

[2] http://www.nazioneindiana.com/2008/12/19/il-mercato-degli-organi-il-buco-nero-della-globalizzazione/

[2] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/18/a-dura-realidade-do-trafico-de-orgaos/

[2] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/11/morte-encefalica-o-teste-da-apneia-somente-e-feito-se-houver-a-intencao-de-matar-o-paciente/

Celso Galli Coimbra – OABRS 11352

Link para esta página e para a reportagem da Revista Newsweek:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/27/trafico-de-orgaos-e-uma-realidade-comprovada-no-brasil/

“The World Health Organization estimates that one fifth of the 70,000 kidneys transplanted worldwide every year come from the black market.”


HEALTH

Not Just Urban Legend

Organ trafficking was long considered a myth. But now mounting evidence suggests it is a real and growing problem, even in America.

By the time her work brought her back to the United States, Nancy Scheper-Hughes had spent more than a decade tracking the illegal sale of human organs across the globe. Posing as a medical doctor in some places and a would-be kidney buyer in others, she had linked gangsters, clergymen and surgeons in a trail that led from South Africa, Brazil and other developing nations all the way back to some of her own country’s best medical facilities. So it was that on an icy February afternoon in 2003, the anthropologist from the University of California, Berkeley, found herself sitting across from a group of transplant surgeons in a small conference room at a big Philadelphia hospital.

By accident or by design, she believed, surgeons in their unit had been transplanting black-market kidneys from residents of the world’s most impoverished slums into the failing bodies of wealthy dialysis patients from Israel, Europe and the United States. According to Scheper-Hughes, the arrangements were being negotiated by an elaborate network of criminals who kept most of the money themselves. For about $150,000 per transplant, these organ brokers would reach across continents to connect buyers and sellers, whom they then guided to “broker-friendly” hospitals here in the United States (places where Scheper-Hughes says surgeons were either complicit in the scheme or willing to turn a blind eye). The brokers themselves often posed as or hired clergy to accompany their clients into the hospital and ensure that the process went smoothly. The organ sellers typically got a few thousand dollars for their troubles, plus the chance to see an American city.

As she made her case, Scheper-Hughes, a diminutive 60-something with splashes of pink in her short, grayish-brown hair, slid a bulky document across the table—nearly 60 pages of interviews she had conducted with buyers, sellers and brokers in virtually every corner of the world. “People all over were telling me that they didn’t have to go to a Third World hospital, but could get the surgery done in New York, Philadelphia or Los Angeles,” she says. “At top hospitals, with top surgeons.” In interview after interview, former transplant patients had cited the Philadelphia hospital as a good place to go for brokered transplants. Two surgeons in the room had also been named repeatedly. Scheper-Hughes had no idea if those surgeons were aware that some of their patients had bought organs illegally. She had requested the meeting so that she could call the transgression to their attention, just in case.

Hospital officials told NEWSWEEK that after meeting with Scheper-Hughes, they conducted an internal review of their transplant program. While they say they found no evidence of wrongdoing on the part of their surgeons, they did tighten some regulations, to ensure better oversight of foreign donors and recipients. “But that afternoon,” Scheper-Hughes says, “they basically threw me out.”

It’s little wonder. The exchange of human organs for cash or any other “valuable consideration” (such as a car or a vacation) is illegal in every country except Iran. Nonetheless, international organ trafficking—mostly of kidneys, but also of half-livers, eyes, skin and blood—is flourishing; the World Health Organization estimates that one fifth of the 70,000 kidneys transplanted worldwide every year come from the black market. Most of that trade can be explained by the simple laws of supply and demand. Increasing life spans, better diagnosis of kidney failure and improved surgeries that can be safely performed on even the riskiest of patients have spurred unprecedented demand for human organs. In America, the number of people in need of a transplant has nearly tripled during the past decade, topping 100,000 for the first time last October. But despite numerous media campaigns urging more people to mark the backs of their driver’s licenses, the number of traditional (deceased) organ donors has barely budged, hovering between 5,000 and 8,000 per year for the last 15 years.

In that decade and a half, a new and brutal calculus has emerged: we now know that a kidney from a living donor will keep you alive twice as long as one taken from a cadaver. And thanks to powerful antirejection drugs, that donor no longer needs to be an immediate family member (welcome news to those who would rather not risk the health of a loved one). In fact, surgeons say that a growing number of organ transplants are occurring between complete strangers. And, they acknowledge, not all those exchanges are altruistic. “Organ selling has become a global problem,” says Frank Delmonico, a surgery professor at Harvard Medical School and adviser to the WHO. “And it’s likely to get much worse unless we confront the challenges of policing it.”

For Scheper-Hughes, the biggest challenge has been convincing people that the problem exists at all. “It used to be a joke that came up at conferences and between surgeons,” she says. “In books and movies, you find these stories of people waking up in bathtubs full of ice with a scar where one of their kidneys used to be. People assumed it was just science fiction.” That assumption has proved difficult to dismantle. In the mid-1980s, rumors that Americans were kidnapping children throughout Central America only to harvest their organs led to brutal attacks on American tourists in the region. When those stories proved false, the State Department classified organ-trafficking reports under “urban legend.” Scheper-Hughes’s evidence, which is largely anecdotal and comes in part from interviews with known criminals, has not convinced department officials otherwise. “It would be impossible to successfully conceal a clandestine organ-trafficking ring,” Todd Leventhal, the department’s countermisinformation officer, wrote in a 2004 report, adding that stories like the ones Scheper-Hughes tells are “irresponsible and totally unsubstantiated.” In recent years, however, the WHO, Human Rights Watch and many transplant surgeons have broken with that view and acknowledged organ trafficking as a real problem.

At first, not even Scheper-Hughes believed the rumors. It was in the mid-1980s, during a study of infant mortality in the shantytowns of northern Brazil, that she initially caught wind of mythical “body snatcher” stories: vans of English-speaking foreigners would circle a village rounding up street kids whose bodies would later be found in trash bins removed of their livers, eyes, kidneys and hearts.

When colleagues in China, Africa and Colombia reported similar rumblings, Scheper-Hughes began poking around. Some stories—especially the ones about kidnapped children, stolen limbs and tourists murdered for organs—were clearly false. But it was also clear that slums throughout the developing world were full of AWOL soldiers, desperate parents and anxious teenage boys willing to part with a kidney or a slice of liver in exchange for cash and a chance to see the world—or at least to buy a car.

Before long, Scheper-Hughes had immersed herself in an underworld of surgeons, criminals and those eager to buy or sell whatever body parts could be spared. In Brazil, Africa and Moldova, newspapers advertised the sale and solicitation of human body parts while brokers trolled the streets with $100 bills, easily recruiting young sellers. In Istanbul, Scheper-Hughes posed as an organ buyer and talked one would-be seller down to $3,000 for his “best kidney.” In

But not all organs flowed from poor countries to rich ones; Americans, for example, were both buyers and sellers in this global market. A Kentucky woman once contacted Scheper-Hughes looking to sell her kidney or part of her liver so that she could buy some desperately needed dentures. And a Brooklyn dialysis patient purchased his kidney from Nick Rosen, an Israeli man who wanted to visit America.

Unlike some organ sellers, who told of dingy basement hospitals with less equipment than a spartan kitchen, Rosen found an organ broker through a local paper in Tel Aviv who arranged to have the transplant done at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. An amateur filmmaker, Rosen documented a portion of his odyssey on camera and sent the film to Scheper-Hughes, whose research he had read about online. The video excerpt that NEWSWEEK viewed shows Rosen meeting his broker and buyer in a New York coffee shop where they haggle over price, then entering Mount Sinai and talking with surgeons—one of whom asks him to put the camera away. Finally, after displaying his post-surgery scars for the camera, Rosen is seen rolling across a hotel bed covered in $20 bills; he says he was paid $15,000. (Brokers, on the other hand, typically net around $50,000 per transplant, after travel and other expenses. In America, some insurance plans will cover at least a portion of the donor’s medical expenses.)

The money changed hands outside the hospital’s corridors, and Rosen says that he deliberately misled the Mount Sinai doctors, but that no one there challenged him. “One hospital in Maryland screened us out,” he says. Tom Diflo, a transplant surgeon at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, points out that many would-be donors do not pass the psychological screening, and that attempting to film the event would probably have set off an alarm bell or two. “But the doctors at Mount Sinai were not very curious about me,” Rosen says. “We told them I was a close friend of the guy who I sold my kidney to, and that I was donating altruistically, and that was pretty much the end of it.” Citing privacy laws, Mount Sinai officials declined to comment on the details of Rosen’s case. But spokesperson Ian Michaels says that the hospital’s screening process is rigorous and comprehensive, and assesses each donor’s motivation. “All donors are clearly advised that it is against the law to receive money or gifts for being an organ donor,” he says. “The pretransplant evaluation may not detect premeditated and skillful attempts to subvert and defraud the evaluation process.”

Because many people do donate organs out of kindness, altruism provides an easy cover for those seeking to profit. And U.S. laws can be easy to circumvent, especially for foreign patients who may pay cash and are often gone in the space of a day. Diflo, who has worked in numerous transplant wards over the past two decades, says that while they are in the minority, hospitals that perform illegal transplants certainly exist in the United States. “There are a couple places around that have reputations for doing transplants with paid donors, and then some hospitals that have a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy,” he says. “It’s definitely happening, but it’s difficult to ferret out.”

Diflo became an outspoken advocate for reform several years ago, when he discovered that, rather than risk dying on the U.S. wait list, many of his wealthier dialysis patients had their transplants done in China. There they could purchase the kidneys of executed prisoners. In India, Lawrence Cohen, another UC Berkeley anthropologist, found that women were being forced by their husbands to sell organs to foreign buyers in order to contribute to the family’s income, or to provide for the dowry of a daughter. But while the WHO estimates that organ-trafficking networks are widespread and growing, it says that reliable data are almost impossible to come by. “Nancy has done truly courageous work, literally risking her life to expose these networks,” says Delmonico. “But anecdotes are impossible to quantify.”

Scheper-Hughes acknowledges that in gathering these anecdotes she has frequently bumped up against the ethical boundaries of her own profession. While UC Berkeley (which funds most of her work) granted special permission for her to go undercover, she still takes heat from colleagues: misrepresenting oneself to research subjects violates a cardinal rule of academic research. “I expect my methods to be met with criticism,” she says. “But being an anthropologist should not mean being a bystander to crimes against the vulnerable.”

While Rosen has fared well since the surgery—he recovered quickly, used the money to travel and stays in touch with his kidney recipient via Facebook—most of the donors Scheper-Hughes and her colleagues have spoken with are not so lucky. Studies show that the health risks posed by donating a kidney are negligible, but those studies were all done in developed countries. “Recovery from surgery is much more difficult when you don’t have clean water or decent food,” says Scheper-Hughes. And research on the long-term effects of organ donation—in any country—is all but nonexistent.

Last may, Scheper-Hughes once again found herself sitting across from a group of transplant surgeons. This time they were not as incredulous. More than 100 of them had come from around the world to Istanbul for a global conference on organ trafficking. Together, they wrote and signed the Declaration of Istanbul, an international agreement vowing to stop the commodification of human organs. But unless their document is followed by action, it will be no match for the thriving organ market. Even as illegal trade is exposed, a roster of Web sites promising to match desperate dialysis patients with altruistic strangers continues to proliferate unchecked. These sites have some surgeons worried. “We have no way to tell if money is changing hands or not,” says Diflo. “People who need transplants end up trying to sell themselves to potential donors, saying, ‘I have a nice family, I go to church,’ etc. Is that really how we want to allocate organs?”

Maybe not. But in the United States, the average wait time for a kidney is expected to increase to 10 years by 2010. Most dialysis patients die in half that time, and the desperate don’t always play by the rules.

http://www.newsweek.com/id/178873

Leia mais em:

Are Kidneys a Commodity?

http://www.newsweek.com/id/137544?tid=relatedcl

Organ Brokers

http://www.socyberty.com/Crime/Organ-Brokers.470441


O juramento dos médicos: “manterei o mais alto respeito pela vida humana, desde sua concepção”

Leia:

Impossibilidade de legalização do aborto no Brasil desde sua proibição constitucional de ir à deliberação pelo Poder Legislativo

Assista:

Aborto: debate na TV Justiça, no STF, em junho de 2007

Endereço destes comentários neste espaço:

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/24/o-juramento-dos-medicos-manterei-o-mais-alto-respeito-pela-vida-humana-desde-sua-concepcao/


Juramento de Hipócrates – Na Declaração de Genebra da Associação Médica Mundial  de 1948 [1] está o juramento mais antigo que tem sido utilizado em vários países na solenidade de recepção aos novos médicos inscritos na respectiva Ordem ou Conselho de Medicina. A versão clássica em língua portuguesa possui a seguinte redação:

“Eu, solenemente, juro consagrar minha vida a serviço da Humanidade. Darei como reconhecimento a meus mestres, meu respeito e minha gratidão.  Praticarei a minha profissão com consciência e dignidade. A saúde dos meus pacientes será a minha primeira preocupação. Respeitarei os segredos a mim confiados. Manterei, a todo custo, no máximo possível, a honra e a tradição da profissão médica. Meus colegas serão meus irmãos. Não permitirei que concepções religiosas, nacionais, raciais, partidárias ou sociais intervenham entre meu dever e meus pacientes. Manterei o mais alto respeito pela vida humana, desde sua concepção. Mesmo sob ameaça, não usarei meu conhecimento médico em princípios contrários às leis da natureza. 

Faço estas promessas, solene e livremente, pela minha própria honra.”

Em versões divulgadas por outros interesses é subtraída a expressão “desde a concepção”.  Em 1994, a Assembléia Geral da Associação Médica Mundial modificou ligeiramente o texto. Sua versão em português ficou com  a expressão “manterei o mais alto respeito pela vida humana”, que, mesmo assim, não exclui a vida desde a concepção como humana, obviamente, de acordo com os conhecimentos científicos vigentes.

Já o texto proposto pela British Medical Association em 1997 dá ênfase à autonomia do paciente, admite o aborto, desde que permitido em lei e praticado dentro de “princípios éticos”, e inclui o consentimento esclarecido do paciente para a sua participação em qualquer investigação científica [2].

Entretanto, dia 13 de janeiro de 2009, ocorreu importante decisão: foi editado o Novo Código Deontológico de Portugal, que permite o aborto apenas para salvar a vida da gestante [3]. Em que pese a legalização do aborto em Portugal no ano de 2007, o Novo Código de Ética Médica daquele país não permitiu sua prática pelos profissionais da medicina, o que deixou a referida legalização fora da prática médica. Este Código Deontológico de 2009 vai muito mais além do que representaria a objeção de consciência, pois firma um consenso ético disciplinar para toda a classe médica daquele país.

Este precedente inovador de Portugal será um forte obstáculo para as pretensões do Conselho Federal de Medicina em redigir novo código de ética médica no Brasil com a permissão para a prática do aborto, apesar de que o CFM considera ter “competência” legislativa acima da própria Constituição Federal como demonstra sua Resolução 1752/04, que “autorizou” o homicídio de anencéfalos (após o nascimento, evidentemente) para retirada de seus órgãos [4].

Se o CFM quiser “legalizar” o aborto em seu novo código de ética, ele entrará em rota de colisão com o art. 4o., I, da Convenção Americana de Direitos Humanos (Pacto da São José da Costa Rica) [5], firmado pelo Brasil em 1992 e vigorando como cláusula pétrea de direitos humanos no bloco constitucional brasileiro, o que significa que não pode ser alterado senão por nova Assembléia Constituinte.

Celso Galli Coimbra – OABRS 11352

[1] http://www.cirp.org/library/ethics/geneva/

[2] http://www.imagerynet.com/hippo.ama.html

[3] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/19/medicos-novo-codigo-deontologico-de-portugal-permite-aborto-apenas-para-preservar-vida-da-gravida/

[4] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/anencefalia-morte-encefalica-e-o-conselho-federal-de-medicina/

[5] https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/convencao-americana-de-direitos-humanos/page/3/

Leia também:

http://sardinhainnaldo.spaceblog.com.br/219617/JURAMENTO-DE-HIPOCRATES/ 


Movimento contesta uso do critério da morte cerebral – “Brain Death” — Enemy of Life and Truth

Em 12 de dezembro de 2000, A Declaração Internacional Brain Death” — Enemy of Life and Truth foi noticiada no JB, que vinha há anos cobrindo a veiculação dos erros declaratórios da morte encefálica. Desde 05 de outubro de 1997, com a matéria “Transplantes com Vivos – Interpelação Judicial acusa que declaração de morte favorece comércio de órgãos[1], ajuizada por nós em 17 de setembro daquele ano, este Jornal tornou público e com continuidade os acontecimentos sobre estes assuntos, objeto de severa censura, pela primeira vez desta forma na história da mídia brasileira, através do jornalista José Mitchell.

Antes disto, apenas o Jornalista Mendes Ribeiro havia escrito sobre o assunto no Jornal Correio do Povo e feito três entrevistas na Rádio Guaíba, no mês de junho de 1997.

Celso Galli Coimbra – OABRS 11352

JORNAL DO BRASIL

Terça-feira, 12 de Dezembro de 2000

Movimento contesta uso do critério da morte cerebral

Condenação de procedimento usado em transplantes tem apoio de 19 países

JOSÉ MITCHELL

PORTO ALEGRE – Uma declaração internacional contra a adoção da morte cerebral como justificativa para retirada de órgãos vitais destinados a transplante, assinada por 117 cientistas, médicos, psiquiatras e advogados de 19 países, começou a ser divulgada ontem pela Internet, denunciando que ”pessoas condenadas à morte pela chamada morte encefálica não estão certamente mortas, mas ao contrário, estão certamente vivas”.

O documento, que será divulgado esta semana pelos órgãos de imprensa, deverá ter fortes reflexos inclusive no Brasil, um dos países que mais realizam transplantes no mundo, e reaviva a polêmica sobre a morte cerebral. Segundo um dos signatários da declaração, o neurologista Cícero Galli Coimbra, da Escola Paulista de Medicina, os critérios adotados para determinar se há morte cerebral não têm base científica.

Coimbra considera ”homicida” o teste da apnéia, que consiste na retirada dos aparelhos em pacientes mantidos vivos por meio de respiração artificial. Esse é um dos meios utilizados no Brasil para determinar se ocorreu ou não morte cerebral.
Intitulado Morte encefálica – inimiga da vida e da verdade, o documento está sendo divulgado por iniciativa da CURE, uma organização católica contra a eutanásia mas que conta também com a participação de médicos e personalidades protestantes, budistas, entre outras religiões, e mesmo sem religião. A mobilização dos cientistas se baseia, também, na mensagem que o papa João Paulo II enviou ao Congresso Internacional da Sociedade de Transplantes, em agosto passado.

João Paulo II alertou para a existência de controvérsias na comunidade científica sobre a morte cerebral. Ressaltou que há necessidade de comprovação da ”completa e irreversível cessação de toda a atividade cerebral, no cérebro, cerebelo e tronco encefálico”, para que se concretize a morte efetiva e se faça a retirada de órgãos para transplante, de forma a que se cumpra a defesa da vida de forma eticamente aceitável.

Mandamento – Segundo cientistas, entretanto, a morte cerebral detectada pelos atuais critérios não é garantia de que isso efetivamente ocorra. O documento, assinado entre outros pelo Presidente da Federação Mundial dos Médicos que Respeitam a Vida, o holandês Karel Gunning, e especialistas como os médicos ingleses David Evans e David Hill e o médico japonês Yoshio Watanabe, afirma que a adesão às restrições apontadas pelo papa e a proibição imposta por Deus na lei natural moral ”impedem os transplantes de órgãos vitais únicos como ato que causa a morte do doador e viola o quinto mandamento: não matarás”.

Médicos como o ex-presidente da Associação Médica Católica dos Estados Unidos, Paul Byrne, dizem que os parâmetros para constatação da morte cerebral ”não são consenso” na comunidade científica. Eles ressaltam que já surgiram mais de 30 protocolos sobre a definição e testes relativos à morte cerebral, só na primeira década após o primeiro transplante, em 1968, acrescentando que, desde então, os transplantes cresceram ”de forma permissiva”.

O documento ressalta que nenhum daqueles protocolos preenche os requisitos estabelecidos pela mensagem do papa João Paulo II. Acrescenta ainda que nem as exigências científicas têm sido rigorosamente aplicadas para comprovação da morte cerebral, enquanto cresce o número de cientistas que questionam o uso desse critério como comprovação do fim da vida.

No link abaixo está a tradução desta declaração para o português com uma introdução que foi veiculada no ano de 2000:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/22/declaracao-internacional-em-oposicao-a-morte-encefalica-e-ao-transplante-de-orgaos-vitais-unicos-traduzido-para-portugues/

[1] Transplantes com Vivos – Interpelação judicial argumenta que conceito de morte no Brasil privilegia comércio de órgãos e é cientificamente ultrapassado”




“Morte encefálica” — Inimiga da Vida e da Verdade – Declaração internacional em oposição à “morte encefálica” e ao transplante de órgãos vitais únicos

Assista:

__

Repercussão na mídia brasileira:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/22/movimento-contesta-uso-do-criterio-da-morte-cerebral-%e2%80%9cbrain-death%e2%80%9d-%e2%80%94-enemy-of-life-and-truth/

Agora, você também pode ser signatário desta importante declaração internacional, acessando o endereço:

http://www.thelifeguardian.org/action=join_us.html

Data de liberação: Imediata, em dez. de 2000

Para informações adicionais contactar:
Earl Appleby Jr.,
mailto:
304-258-5433 (telefone) 258 – 5420 (fax)
Endereço desta tradução, neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/22/declaracao-internacional-em-oposicao-a-morte-encefalica-e-ao-transplante-de-orgaos-vitais-unicos-traduzido-para-portugues/

Endereço do texto em inglês:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/22/%e2%80%9cbrain-death%e2%80%9d%e2%80%94enemy-of-life-and-truth/

Segue antes o texto com que ela foi veiculada em dezembro de 2000, no Brasil. A maioria dos brasileiros que assinaram esta declaração também outorgaram procuração para questionar a validade dos critérios declaratórios de morte encefálica no Brasil, em maio do mesmo ano, 2000. Esta providência obteve sucesso no ano de 2003/2004, obrigando o CFM a enfrentar às questões técnicas neurológicas pertinentes sem conseguir sustentar a validade do seu procedimento declaratório, conforme postaremos estes textos neste espaço em breve:

Na oportunidade de um “renovado interesse nas controvérsias em torno da ‘morte encefálica’ e do transplante de órgãos” que se segue à mensagem do Papa João Paulo II ao Congresso Internacional da Sociedade de Transplantes em Agosto último, Cidadãos Unidos Resistindo à Eutanásia (CURE) torna pública sua declaração “Morte Encefálica – Inimiga da Vida e da Verdade”.

Assinada por mais do que 100 personalidades originárias de 19 países, a declaração representa a mais fortemente corroborada proclamação até hoje anunciada a se opor tanto à “morte encefálica” como ao transplante de órgãos vitais únicos.

Incluem-se entre os signatários dois bispos Católico-Romanos, religiosos, sacerdotes, e outros clérigos; dois membros da Academia Pontifícia pela Vida e um antigo Secretário da Academia; médicos, professores, juízes, advogados e outros profissionais; defensores dos direitos dos portadores de deficiências e da vida. Entre os signatários incluem-se destacados críticos da “morte encefálica” tais como o Dr. Paul Byrne (Estados Unidos), Dr. Cícero Coimbra (Brasil), Dr. David Evans (Inglaterra), Prof. Josef Seifert (Liechtenstein) e o Dr. Yoshio Watanabe (Japão).

Observando que nenhum dos conjuntos mutantes dos “assim denominados” critérios neurológicos para a determinação da morte preenche os requisitos descritos pelo Papa em sua mensagem, a declaração afirma que, “Na realidade a ‘morte encefálica’ não é morte, e que a morte não deve ser declarada a menos que todo o encéfalo e os sistemas circulatório e respiratório tenham sido destruídos.”

Citando a admoestação do Papa quanto ao fato de que órgãos vitais únicos podem ser removidos apenas “do corpo de quem se encontra certamente morto … já que os atos em contrário significariam provocar-se intencionalmente a morte do doador”, a declaração conclui que a “adesão às restrições impostas pelo Papa” e “pelo Próprio Deus na Lei Moral Natural” impede o transplante de órgãos vitais únicos, um ato que viola o mandamento divino “Não matarás.”

Fundada em 1981, “Cidadãos Unidos Resistindo à Eutanásia” é a mais antiga organização unidirecionada contra a eutanásia nos Estados Unidos. Aqueles que desejarem adicionar seus nomes aos atuais signatários da declaração devem escrever ao CURE, 812 Stephen Street, Berkeley Springs, WV 25411, USA; ou enviar seus nomes através de mensagem eletrônica para cureltd@ix.netcom.com.

Informações adicionais podem ser encontradas na página eletrônica do CURE, http://cureltd.home.netcom.com

Segue-se a declaração completa incluindo a lista dos atuais signatários:


“Morte encefálica” — Inimiga da Vida e da Verdade


A mensagem do Papa João Paulo II datada de 29 de Agosto de 2000, endereçada ao Congresso Internacional da Sociedade de Transplantes tem despertado renovado interesse nas controvérsias em evolução acerca da “morte encefálica” e transplante de órgãos. Apesar de que essas controvérsias literalmente envolvem temas relativos à vida e à morte tanto sob o aspecto físico como espiritual, uma clara compreensão da sua natureza é vital à sobrevida tanto da vida como da verdade – esta considerada a guardiã da primeira.

Como a questão do transplante de órgãos não pode ser apropriadamente julgada tanto sob o ponto de vista lógico como ético na ausência do que o Papa descreve como “um meio cientificamente seguro de identificar-se os sinais biológicos de que uma pessoa tenha de fato morrido” (4), devemos primeiramente examinar o conceito de “morte encefálica”, que serve como racionalização para a remoção de órgãos vitais daqueles descritos como “doadores”.


“Morte Encefálica”


Notando-se uma mudança na ênfase na determinação da morte “dos sinais cárdio-respiratórios tradicionais para o assim denominado ‘critério neurológico’, o Santo Padre afirma que essa mudança consiste em “estabelecer-se, de acordo com parâmetros claramente determinados e assumidos de forma consensual pela comunidade científica internacional, a completa e irreversível cessação de toda a atividade encefálica (no cérebro, cerebelo e tronco encefálico).” (5)

Os parâmetros variadamente propostos para declarar-se uma pessoa como em estado de “morte encefálica”, porém, não são nem “claramente determinados” nem são “assumidos de forma consensual” pela comunidade científica.

Ao contrário, a miríade de versões dos critérios de “morte encefálica” introduzidos desde a publicação do artigo reveladoramente intitulado “Uma Definição do Coma Irreversível” em 1968 – mais de 30 versões apenas na primeira década – tem se tornado progressivamente mais permissiva. Paralelamente, um número crescente de membros da comunidade científica tem analisado mais acuradamente a “morte encefálica” e encontram-se verbalizando suas preocupações.

Para saber-se com certeza moral que “a completa e irreversível cessação de todas as atividades encefálicas (no cérebro, cerebelo e tronco encefálico)” ocorreu requer-se a total ausência de toda a circulação e respiração. A confirmação dessa ausência tornaria necessário que o cérebro, o cerebelo e o tronco encefálico houvessem sido destruídos, assim como o os sistemas circulatório e respiratório.

Nenhum dos conjuntos mutáveis dos “assim denominados ‘ critérios neurológicos” para a determinação da morte atende ao requisito do Papa de que sejam “rigorosamente aplicados” para assegurar-se “a completa e irreversível cessação de toda a atividade encefálica.” (5) De fato, a “morte encefálica” não é morte, e a morte não deve ser declarada a menos que todo o encéfalo e os sistemas respiratório e circulatório tenham sido destruídos.


Transplante de órgãos


Reiterando suas palavras no Evangelium Vitae (86), o Santo Padre sugeriu que “uma forma de cultivar uma genuína Cultura da Vida ‘é a doação de órgãos, executada de uma forma eticamente aceitável.”(1)

Uma forma que é “eticamente aceitável” é a que corresponde à Lei Moral Natural e seus quatro axiomas: (1) O bem deve ser praticado, e o mal evitado. (2) O bem não deve ser sustado. (3) O mal não deve ser praticado. (4) O mal não deve ser praticado para a obtenção do bem.

Dessa forma, a obtenção de órgãos através de meios que venham a ocasionar a mutilação debilitadora ou a morte do “doador” não podem ser encarados como “eticamente aceitáveis”.

Ao descrever a decisão de doar um órgão bastante apropriadamente como “um gesto decisivo”, o Papa ponderou, “A autenticidade humana de tal gesto requer que os indivíduos sejam apropriadamente informados a respeito dos processos envolvidos, de forma a acharem-se na posição de consentirem ou declinarem de forma consciente”. (3)

Para que seja apropriadamente informada, a pessoa que considera a doação de órgãos deve ser educada a respeito da natureza do transplante de órgãos. Em particular, ela deve ser avisada que, preliminarmente à excisão, seu coração encontrar-se- á saudável e capaz de participar da circulação e respiração normais, mas após a retirada de seu corpo de qualquer órgão necessário à vida, ela morrerá. O futuro “doador” deve também ser informado de que um agente paralisante será administrado para impedí-la de mover-se quando a incisão for feita e avisada se anestesia ser-lhe-á administrada preliminarmente à retirada dos seus órgãos, tal como tem sido recomendada por anestesistas.

Para que a liberdade não seja confundida com licença, deve-se assinalar que a liberdade consiste no exercício da liberdade individual em concordância com o raciocínio correto, que busca o bem e evita o mal. Matar-se a si ou a outrem jamais pode ser considerado de acordo com o raciocínio correto.

O Santo Padre faz uma restrição crítica à remoção de órgãos à luz da “singular dignidade da pessoa humana”, estipulando que os órgãos vitais que ocorrem unitariamente no corpo somente podem ser removidos após a morte, ou seja, removidos do corpo de quem se encontra certamente morto.” (4) O Papa acrescenta que “tal requisito é auto-evidente, já que agir-se de outra forma implica em provocar-se intencionalmente a morte do doador ao retirar-se seus órgãos”.

Para que os órgãos vitais sejam adequados para o transplante, porém, eles devem ser órgãos vivos removidos de seres humanos vivos. Ademais, como foi assinalado anteriormente, pessoas condenadas à morte ao terem declarada sua “morte encefálica” não se encontram “certamente mortas” mas, ao contrário, encontram-se certamente vivas.

Dessa forma, a adesão às restrições estipuladas pelo Papa e as proibições impostas pelo Próprio Deus na Lei Moral Natural impede o transplante de órgãos vitais únicos, um ato que causa a morte do “doador” e viola o quinto mandamento do Decálogo divino, “Não matarás” (Deut 5:17).


Paul A. Byrne, M.D., FAAP
Past President, Catholic Medical Association
Oregon, Ohio

Walt F. Weaver, M.D., FACC
Clinical Associate Professor, School of Medicine
University of Nebraska
Omaha, Nebraska

Prof. Josef Seifert, Ph.D.
Rector, International Academy for Philosophy
Furstentum, Liechtenstein

Mercedes Arzu Wilson, L.H.D.
President, Family of the Americas Foundation

Dunkirk, Maryland

Bernice Jones
Lifeguardian Foundation
Vancouver, WA

Bishop Fabian Wendelin Bruskewitz Bishop Robert F. Vasa
Diocese of Lincoln Diocese of Baker
Lincoln, Nebraska Baker, Oregon

Archbishop Lawrence Saphonophon-Khai Fr. Christian Marie Charlot
Archdiocese of Thare-Nonseng Former Secretary, Pontifical Academy for Life
Sakkonakhon, Thailand President, World for Children
Bagnoregio, Italy

Prof. Josef Seifert, Ph.D. Mercedes Arzú Wilson, L.H.D.
Ordinary Member, Pontifical Academy for Life Ordinary Member, Pontifical Academy for Life
Rector, International Academy for Philosophy President, Family of the
Americas Foundation Furstenstum, Liechtenstein Dunkirk, Maryland

Judie Brown Fr. Thomas Euteneur.
Corresponding Member, Pontifical Academy for Life President, Human Life International
President, American Life League Front Royal, Virginia
Stafford, Virginia

Julie Grimstad Earl E. Appleby, Jr.
Director, Center for the Rights of the Terminally Ill Director, Citizens United Resisting Euthanasia
Stephens, Wisconsin Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 3)

Neleide Abila
Professor of Law, Universidade Paranaense
Guaira, Brazil

Madonna R. Adams. Ph.D.
Past Director, Center for Applied Ethics, Pace University
Instructor in Philosophy, Caldwell College
Caldwell, New Jersey

Lawrence A. Adekoya, kcss
Executive Director/National Organiser, Human Life Protection League
Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria.

Maria Sophia Aguirre, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Economics, Catholic University of America
Washington, DC

Fr. Fred Alexander, S.O.L.T.
General Procurator, Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity
Hythe, England

William B. Allen, Ph.D.
Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan

Jack Ames
Director, Defend Life
Baltimore, Maryland

Mary Jo Anderson
Contributing Editor, Crisis
Washington, DC

Br. Anthony, O.S.F.
Vocation Director, Franciscan Brothers of the Sacred Heart
Vice President, Diocesan Board of Catholic Education and Formation
Fargo, North Dakota

John P. Antony, J.D.
Highland Heights, Kentucky

Marcos Antonio Aranda, M.D.
Director, ICU, and Chief, Department of Pulmonology, Hospital Clinicordis
São Paulo, Brazil

João Araújo, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics, Universidade Alberta
Lisbon, Portugal

Hamilton Reed Armstrong
Sculptor, Writer, Lecturer
Instructor in Art History, International Catholic University
Notre Dame, Indiana

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 4)

Michael Asuzu, M.D.
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University Teaching Hospital
Ibadan, Nigeria

Kathleen O. Balbach
Office Manager, Hope of St. Monica
Milford, Ohio

Marian Banducci
Director, Voice for the Unborn
Modesto, California

Elena Barberis
Social Assistant
Valmadoona, Italy

Carlo Barbieri
Genoa Representative, Famiglia e Civilità
Genoa, Italy

Deacon Roy Barkley, Ph.D.
Senior Editor, Texas State Historical Association
Austin, Texas

Gary L. Bauer
Chairman, Campaign for Working Families
Arlington, Virginia

Michael Bauman, Ph. D.
Professor of Theology and Culture and Director of Christian Studies, Hillsdale College
Hillsdale, Michigan

Dr. Med. Paolo Bavastro
Chief Dr. ICU and Department of Internal Medicine, Filderklinik
Fildestadt, Germany

Richard P. Becker, RN, MS MA
Bethel College
Mishawaka, Indiana

Michael J. Behe, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow, Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture
Seattle, Washington
Professor of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Christopher R. Bell
President, Good Counsel, Inc.
Hoboken, New Jersey

Joan Andrews Bell
Director, PIETA Mission
Hoboken, New Jersey

Dr. Andrew F. Bella
Consultant Physician, Michael Bella Memorial Hospital
Ibadan, Nigeria

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 5)

Yuri Belozorov
Director, Choose Life
Vladivostock, Russia

James Bendell
Attorney at Law
Port Townsend, Washington

J. Brian Benestad, Ph.D.
Corresponding Member, Pontifical Academy for Life
Board of Directors, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Professor of Theology, University of Scranton
Scranton, Pennsylvania

Iain T. Benson B.A. (Hons.), M.A., LLB.
Barrister & Solicitor
Bowen Island, British Columbia, Canada

Fr. Frederick Bentley, OHI
Anglican Priests for Life
Endinboro, Pennsylvania

Paul Bernetsky,
Executive Director, Youth for the Third Millennium
Potomac, Maryland

Robin Bernhoft, M.D., FACS
Chairman, National Parents Commission
Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Andrew Richard Berry
Disability Rights Advocate
London, England

Giuseppe Bertolini, M.D.
Specialist in Anesthesia and Resuscitation, Ospedale Ruiniti di Roma
Rome, Italy

Cledson Ramos Bezerra
Attorney at Law
João Pessoa, Brazil

John F. Billings, J.D.
Attorney at Law
Lexington, Kentucky

Jerrold G. Black, M.D.
Family Practice Physician
Lincoln, Nebraska

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 6)

Karla Bladel, M.D., FACOG
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Vice President, Rock Island County Medical Society
Rock Island, Illinois

John W. Blewett
President Emeritus, The Wanderer Forum Foundation
Managing Editor, The Latin Mass
Ramsey, New Jersey

Stephanie Block
Director, Special Research Projects, The Wanderer Forum Foundation
Hudson, Wisconsin

Marcella K. Boehm
Cincinnati, Ohio

Wallace L. Boever, M.S.
Clinic Manager, Holy Family Medical Specialties
Lincoln, Nebraska

Paul C. Boling, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy and Bible, William Jennings Bryan College
Dayton, Tennessee

Dr. Manuele Bondì
Department of Biological Evolution, Università di Parma
Parma, Italy

Massimo Bondì, M.D., L.D.
Former General Surgeon
Medical Board, Sydney, Australia
Professor of Surgical Pathology, Università degli Studî di Roma “La Sapienza”
Rome, Italy

Deacon Carlo Bonicello
Valmadonna, Italy

Stephen G. Brady
President, Roman Catholic Faithful
Petersburg, Illinois

Gerard V. Bradley, J.D.
Past President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Vice President, American Public Philosophy Institute
Professor of Law, University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana

Fr. Anthony Brankin, S.T.L.
Chaplain, Chicago Chapter, Legatus Foundation
St. Thomas More Church
Chicago, Illinois

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 7)

Dr. Michael Brear, MB, BS, DTM&H, LMCC
General Practitioner
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

William Brennan, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Social Service, St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri

Montague Brown, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology and Chair, Department of Psychology, St. Anselm’s College
Manchester, New Hampshire

Paul R. Bruch, M.D.
Past President, Connecticut Right to Life Corporation
Southbury, Connecticut

Léo Brust
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Rene Josef Bullecer, M.D.
Director. AIDS -Free Philippines. Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines
Health Representative for Asia, Pontifical Council for Pastoral Health Care
Executive Director, HLI-Visayas, Mindanao
Visayas, Philippines

J. Kevin Burke, MSS, LSW
Theresa Karminski Burke, Ph.D.
Founders, Rachel’s Vineyard Ministries
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania

Lilo Cadrin
President, St. Paul Pro-Life Association
St. Paul, Alberta, Canada

Guido Cantamessa, M.D.
Family Practice and Specialist in Anesthesia and Resuscitation
Bergamo, Italy

Rev. Graham Capill, BD, LLB
Party Leader, Christian Heritage Party of New Zealand
Christchurch, New Zealand

Alberto Carosa
Journalist
Rome, Italy

Samuel B. Casey, J.D.
Executive Director and CEO, Christian Legal Society
Annandale, Virginia

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth – Page 8

Keith Cassidy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History, University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Timothy A. Chichester
Executive Director, Yankee Samizdat
Austerlitz, New York

Motoharu Chimori
Onoda, Japan

Helen Cindrich
Executive Director, People Concerned for the Unborn Child
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Charley Clements
Director, Eagle Cross Alliance
Houston, Texas

Greg Clovis
Executive Director, Human Life International-UK
London, England

Kurt Clyne M.S., Pharm.D.
Director, Pharmacy, St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center
Lincoln, Nebraska

Celso Galli Coimbra
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Cicero Galli Coimbra, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Universidade Federal de São Paulo
São Paulo, Brazil

Dr. Anthony P. Cole, FRCP, RFCPCH
Director, Lejeune Clinic
London, England

Kathy Coll
Director, Pro-Life Coalition
Havertown, Pennsylvania

William F. Colliton, Jr., M.D., FACOG
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology, George Washington University
Washington, DC

Anne Costa
Friends for Life, Inc.
Baldwinsville, New York

William Cotter
Chairman, St. Stanislaus Council
President, Operation Rescue: Boston
Milton Village, Massachusetts

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 9)

Fr. Absalom Coutinho
Palmetto, Florida

Catherine T. Coyle, R.N., Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Education, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

Carlito V. Cruz, M.D.
General Surgeon, St. John Hospital and Medical Center
Detroit, Michigan

Gregg Cunningham, J.D.
Executive Director, The Center for Bio-Ethical Reform
Los Angeles, California

Joseph W. Cunningham, Esq.
President, The Society of Blessed Gianna Beretta Molla
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

W. Patrick Cunningham
Principal, Central Catholic High School
San Antonio, Texas

Lorna L. Cvetkovitch, M.D.
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Lincoln, Nebraska

Fr. Thomas Dailey, OSFS, S.T.D,
President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Professor of Theology and Director, Salesian Center of Faith and Culture, DeSales University
Center Valley, Pennsylvania

Mary Davenport, M.D., FACOG
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
El Sobrante, California

Michael Davies
President, International Una Voce Federation
London, England

Camille E. De Blasi, M.A.
Director, Center for Life Principles
Redmond, Washington

Kurenai Deguchi
Spiritual Leader, Oomoto
Kameoka, Japan

Kyotaro Deguchi
Advisor, Oomoto Foundation
Kameoka, Japan

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 10)

Dr. Michael Delany
London, England

Deacon Rafael de los Reyes
Pax Catholic Communications, Archdiocese of Miami
Miami, Florida

Roberto de Mattei
Professor of Modern History, Università degli Studî di Cassino
Cassino, Italy

William A. Dembski, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow, Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture, Discovery Institute
Seattle, Washington
Associate Research Professor in the Conceptual Foundations of Science, Baylor University
Waco, Texas

Fr. Edouard de Mentque, F.S.S.P.
Chaplain, Latin Mass Community
Kansas City, Kansas

Robert Desmond, M.D.
Emergency Department, Wood County Hospital
Bowling Green, Ohio

Raymond J. de Souza
Catholic Apologist and Founder, St. Gabriel’s Communications
Forrestfield, Australia

Robert A. Destro, J.D.
Professor of Law and Director, Interdisciplinary Program in Religion and Law
Columbus School of Law, Catholic University of America
Washington, DC

Fr. Alphonse de Valk, c.s.b.
Editor and Publisher, Catholic Insight
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Donald K. DeWolf, J.D.
Senior Fellow, Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture, Discovery Institute
Seattle, Washington
Professor of Law, Gonzaga University School of Law
Spokane, Washington

Marie Dietz
Director, Center for Pro-Life Studies
North Troy, Vermont

John R. Diggs, Jr., M.D.
Medical Board, National Abstinence Clearinghouse
Sioux Falls, South Dakota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 11)

Bernard Dobranski, J.D.
Vice-President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Dean and Professor of Law, Ave Maria Law School
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Chiara Donati
Ravenna, Italy

David J. Dooley, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of English, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto
Associate Editor, Catholic Insight
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Dr. Bert P. Dorenbos
President, Schreeuw Om Leven
Hilversum, Netherlands

John F. Downs
Director, Partners in the Cross
Mt. Jackson, Virginia

Jim Dowson
National Organizer, Precious Life Scotland
Cumbernauld, Scotland

Tim Drake
Journalist, National Catholic Register
St. Cloud, Minnesota

Thomas A. Drolesky, Ph.D.
Publisher and Editor, Christ or Chaos
Cincinnati, Ohio

Christina Dunigan
Writer and Researcher
Former Pro-Life Guide, About.com
Baltimore, Maryland

Lloyd J. Duplantis, Jr., P.D.
President Emeritus, Pharmacists for Life International
Gray, Louisiana

Sr. Lucille Durocher
Founder, St. Joseph’s Workers for Life & Family
Vanier, Ontario, Canada

Cheryl Eckstein
Founder and President, Compassionate Healthcare Network
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada

Reinhold Eichinger
Founder, Pro Life Data Exchange/Börse für das Leben
Duesseldorf, Germany

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 12)

Charbel El-Chaar
Director, St. Charbel for Life
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Kenneth G. Elzinga, Ph.D., L.H.D.
Professor of Economics, University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia

Randy Engel
President, The Michael Fund International Foundation for Genetic Research
Export, Pennsylvania

Robert D. Enright, Ph.D.
Professor of Human Development, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

David Wainwright Evans, M.D., FRCP
Fellow Commoner of Queens’ College
Cambridge, England

H. Martyn Evans, Ph.D.
Director Emeritus, Center for Philosophy and Health Care, University of Swansea
Swansea, Wales

Joseph C. Evers, M.D., FAAP
Pediatrician
McLean, Virginia

Timothy R. Fangman, M.D., FACC
Cardiovascular Medicine
Omaha, Nebraska

Sydney O. Fernandes, M.D., M.B.B.S., F.C.P.S., ABIM, ABFP
Internal Medicine
Oregon, Ohio

Vera Maria Vargas Ferreira
Attorney
Porto Alegre, Brazil

J. Fraser Field
Executive Officer, Catholic Educator’s Resource Center
Powell River, British Columbia, Canada

James P. Finnegan
Co-Director, Vote Life America
Barrington, Illinois

Timothy H. Fisher, M.D.
Family Practice Physician
Lincoln, Nebraska

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 13)

Fr. Gregoire J. Fluet, Ph.D. candidate
Pastor, St Bridget of Kildare
Moodus, Connecticut

Frank J. Forlini Jr. M.D.
Cardiologist
Director, Cardiovascular Institute of Northwestern Illinois
Rock Island, Illinois

David F. Forte, J.D.
Professor of Law, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

Jeffrey L. Fortenberry, M.S., M.A.
Member, Lincoln City Council
Lincoln, Nebraska

Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Humanities, Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia

Nelson Fragelli
Director, Droit de Naître
Paris, France

Sheila Franco
Geologist
Niterói, Brazil

Winston L. Frost, LL.M.
Dean, Trinity Law School
Santa Ana, California

Luigi Gagliardi, M.D.
Head Physician, Department of Thoracic Surgery (retired)
Ospedale Forlanini di Roma
Professor Emeritus
Università degli Studî di Roma ‘La Sapienza’
Rome, Italy

Fr. Daniel Gauthier, o.ff.m.
Pastor, St. Margaret of Scotland Church
North Lancaster, Ontario, Canada

Sean Marie Gertz, Esq.
Tony Gertz
Attorney at Law
Reading, Ohio

Brian Gibson
Executive Director, Pro-Life Action Ministries
St. Paul, Minnesota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 14)

Maciej Giertych, Ph.D., D.Sc.
Chairman, Department of Genetics, Institute of Dendrology, Polska Akademia Nauk
Kórnik, Poland

Camille Giglio
Director, California Right to Life
Pleasant Hill, California

Jennifer Ann Gigowski
Jerry Thomas Gigowski
Founders, Life Is Precious Ministries
Indianapolis, Indiana

Fr. Patrick Gillooly
Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

Steve Gilmore
Charlotte, North Carolina

Corrado Gnerre
Professor of Religion, Instituti Scienze Religiose ‘Giovanni Paolo II’ di Foggia
Foggia, Italy

Gentil Gonçales Filho
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Pontificia Universidade Católica de Campinas
Campinas, Brazil

Marcelo A. González
Executive Editor, Panorama Católico Internacional
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Fr. James E. Goode, OFM, Ph.D.
President, National Black Catholic Apostolate for Life
New York, New York

Giuseppe Gori
Leader, Family Coalition Party of Ontario
Stoufville, Ontario, Canada

Carlo Govoni, M.D.
Surgeon and Specialist in Ear and Throat and 1st Level Director, Ospedale di Verbania
Verbania, Italy

Alice Ann Grayson
Founder and President, Veil of Innocence
Catasauqua, Pennsylvania

Samuel Gregg, D.Phil.
Director, Center for Economic Personalism, Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty
Grand Rapids, Michigan

Fr. Benedict J. Groeschel, C.F.R., Ed. D.
Director, Office for Spiritual Development, Archdiocese of New York
Larchmont, New York

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 15)

Karel F. Gunning, M.D.
President, World Federation of Doctors Who Respect Human Life
Rotterdam, Netherlands

Fr. Matthew Habiger, O.S.B., Ph.D.
Board of Directors, Human Life International
Front Royal, Virginia

Emil Hagamu
Chairman, Pro-Life Tanzania
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Lucy Hancock, Ph.D.
Consultant, World Bank
Washington, DC

Mark Harrington
Executive Director, The Center for Bio-Ethical Reform—Midwest
Westerville, Ohio

Denny Hartford
Director, Vital Signs Ministries
Omaha, Nebraska

Charles Harvey
Contributing Editor, Envoy
Steubenville, Ohio

Lucky M. Hatta
Founder and President, Pro Life Indonesia
Turangga Bandung, Indonesia

The Rt. Rev. Mark Haverland, Ph.D.
Bishop Ordinary, Diocese of the South
Anglican Catholic Church
Athens, Georgia

Paul L. Hayes, M.D., FACOG
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Lincoln, Nebraska

Les Hemingway, M.D.
Family Physician
Morlane, Australia

Carlos Heredia F.
Commercial Engineer
Professor Emeritus, Universidad de Cuenca
Professor Emeritus, Universidad del Azuay
Cuenca, Ecuador “Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 16)

Jerome B. Higgins, D.V.M.
Chairman, Long Island Coalition for Life
Ronkonkoma, New York

David J. Hill, M.A., FRCA
Emeritus Consultant Anesthetist
Cambridge, England

Jonathan Hill
Chairman, Massachusetts Reform Party
New Bedford, Massachusetts

Yasumi Hirose
Honorary President, Jinuri Aizenkai
Kameoka, Japan

Helen Hull Hitchcock
Director, Women for Faith & Family
St. Louis, Missouri

James Hitchcock, Ph.D.
Senior Editor, Touchstone
Past President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Professor of History, St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri

Benno Hofschulte
Director, Aktion SOS LEBEN
Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Terence J. Hughes, Ph.D.
Professor of Geological Sciences and Quaternary and Climate Studies, University of Maine
Orono, Maine

Glenn M. Hultgren, D.C.
Chairman, Christian Bioethics Awareness Committee
Founder and Executive Secretary, Christian Chiropractors Association
Fort Collins, Colorado

Rachel Hurst
Director, Disability Awareness in Action
London, England

Thomas Hutte, M.D.
Surgeon, A.C.S.
Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky

John J. Jakubczyk
Board of Directors, National Lawyers Association
President, Arizona Right to Life
Phoenix, Arizona

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 17)

The Reverend Canon Eric Jarvis, M.A.
Canon Emeritus, Cathedral Church of St. Peter and St. Wilfrid
Ripon, England

Marianne M. Jennings, J.D.
Professor of Legal and Ethical Studies and Director, Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, Arizona State University
Phoenix, Arizona

Fr. David Albert Jones, O.P., M.A.
Director, Linacre Centre for Healthcare Ethics
London, England

Derek L. Jones
Councillor, Deal Town Council
Deal, England

Michael M. Jordan, Ph.D.
Kirk Professor in English and Director, American Studies Program, Hillsdale College
Hillsdale, Michigan

Anthony M. Kam, M.D., FACS
Chief of Staff, Sheridan Community Hospital
Sheridan, Michigan

Dr. med. Claudia Kaminski
Chairman, Aktion Lebensrecht für Alle e.V.
Chairman, Bundesverband Lebensrecht (BVL)
Düsseldorf, Germany

George Byron Kerford, Ph.D.
Chairman and CEO, World Association of Persons with disAbilities
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Genevieve S. Kineke
Editor, Canticles
Host, Women in the Church Today
Executive Director, Catholic Alliance of Women
East Greenwich, Rhode Island

Andreas Kirchmair
President, Werk für menschenwuerdige Therapieformen
Senior Consultant
Graz, Austria

Nelson D. Kloosterman, Th.D.
Professor of Ethics and New Testament, Mid-America Reformed Seminary
Dyer, Indiana

M.A. Klopotek, Dr. Eng. Habil.
Professor, Institute of Computer Sciences, Akademia Polska
Siedice, Poland “Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth – Page 18

Mary Ann Kreitzer
President, Les Femmes
Vienna, Virginia

Al Kresta
CEO, Ave Maria Radio
Host, Kresta in the Afternoon
Executive Editor, Credo
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Mary Ann Kuharski
Director, Prolife Across America
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Arthur M. Kunath, M.D., LTCΒUSAR (ret.)
Rheumatologist, Kunath, Burte, Temming, M.D. PSC
Covington, Kentucky

Paul Lagan
President, Alliance for Life Ministries
Madison, Wisconsin

Thomas Langan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, University of Toronto
President, Catholic Civil Rights League
Toronto, Canada

Jerome L’Ecuyer, M.D., FAAP
Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
St. Louis University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Missouri

Charles T. Lester, Jr.
Attorney at Law
Ft. Thomas, Kentucky

Marco Lettieri
Natale Lettieri
Ombretta, Italy

Fr. Robert J. Levis, Ph.D.
Co-Host, The Web of Faith, EWTN
Spiritual Director, Fraternitas Marialis Regina Cleri
Vice President, Confraternity of Catholic Clergy
Erie, Pennsylvania

Thomas H. Lieser, M.D., MPH, FACOEM
Board Certified, Family Practice and Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Adjunct Faculty, Medical College of Ohio
Toledo, Ohio

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 19)

James Likoudis
Past President, Catholics United for the Faith
Montour Falls, New York

Felice Livi, M.D.
Rome, Italy

Greg P. Lloyd, M.A.
Executive Director, National Coalition of Clergy and Laity
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Pat Lohman
Director, AAAWomen for Choice of Manassas Pregnancy Center
Manassas, Virginia

Stephen B. Lopez, Esq.
Board of Directors, National Lawyers Association
Founder and Board of Directors, Life Legal Defense Foundation
President and CEO, Light Horse Ventures, LLC
San Francisco, California

Rudolph M. Lohse
Faithful Catholics of Central Florida
Orlando, Florida

Dr. med. Johann Loibner
General Practitioner
Graz, Austria

Luiz Anderson Lopes, M.D.
Pediatric Department, Escola Paulista de Medicina
Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Professor of Pediatrics, Universidade de Santo Amoro
São Paulo, Brazil

Nicholas J. Lowry
Secretary, Latin Mass Society of Ireland
Editor, Brandsma Review
Dun Loaghaire, Ireland

Daniel Lynch
Judge
Director, Apostolates of the Missionary Image and Jesus King of All Nations
St. Albans, Vermont

Rev. Patrick Mahoney
Director, Christian Defense Coalition
Washington, DC

David P. Marciniak, R.N.
Host, Seek First
WLOF-FM
Buffalo, New York “Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 20)

Gordon Marino, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Director, Hong/Kierkegaard Library, St. Olaf College
Northfield, Minnesota

Honorable Bob Marshall
Member, Virginia House of Delegates—13th District
Manassas, Virginia

Curtis Martin
President, Fellowship of Catholic University Students
Greeley, Colorado

Fr. Paul Marx, O.S.B., Ph.D.
Founder, Human Life International
Founder, Population Research Institute
Collegeville, Minnesota

Satou Masahiko
Journalist
Sapporo, Japan

Kouji Matsumoto
Editor, INOCHI Journal
Kobe, Japan

Maria Cristina Mattioli
Judge, 15th Circuit Federal Labor Court
Campinas, Brazil

Fr. Daniel Maurer, C.J.D.
Canons Regular of Jesus the Lord
Vladivostok, Russia

Hermengild J. Mayunga
Executive Director, Care of the Needy
Mwanza, Tanzania

Msgr. John F. McCarthy, J.C.D., S.T.D.
Editor, Living Tradition
Director General, The Society of the Oblates of Wisdom
Eastman, Wisconsin

John McCarthy, Q.C.
President, St. Thomas More Society
Sydney, Australia

Kathleen B. McCormick
Newport, Kentucky

Dr. Patricia McEwen
Ministry Coordinator, Life Coalition International
Melbourne Florida

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 21)

Patricia McKeever B.Ed. M.Th.
Editor, Catholic Truth
Kilsyth, Scotland

Teresa McKenna, M.D., FRCA, FRCP(C)
Anesthetist
Markham, Ontario. Canada

Daphne McLeod
Chairman, Ecclesia et Pontifice
Great Bookham, England

Fr. James McLucas
Editor in Chief, The Latin Mass
Ramsey, New Jersey

Jay McNally
Trustee, Call to Holiness
Managing Editor, Credo
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Philip D. McNeely, M.D.
Family Practice Physician
Lincoln, Nebraska

Mary S. Meade, Esq. *
Executive Director, The Natural Law Center
Falls Church, Virginia

Walter Menz
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

The Rt. Rev. Robert W.S. Mercer, CR
Diocesan Bishop, Anglican Catholic Church of Canada
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Clare McGrath Merkle
Editor, The Cross and the Veil
St. Clement’s Bay, Maryland

Fr. Daniel Meynen
Author
Host, Homily Service
Jambes, Belgium

Niamh Nic Mhathuna
Chairwoman, Mother and Child Campaign, Youth Defence
Dublin, Ireland

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 22)

Daniel Michael
Co-Coordinator, Small Victories, NFP
Highland, Illinois

Mark Miravale, Ph.D., S.T.D.
Professor of Theology, Franciscan University
Steubenville, Ohio

Brian Moccia, RRT
Registered Respiratory Therapist (retired), St. Joseph’s Health Centre
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Charles Molineaux
President, The Brent Society
Arlington, Virginia

Maria Giuliani Monica
San Andrea do Sorbello, Italy

Dr. Orestes P. Monzon
Professor and Chairman, Division of Radiological Sciences, Santo Tomas University Hospital
Manila, Philippines

Fr. James Morrow
Humane Vitae House
Braemar, Scotland

Steven W. Mosher
President, Population Research Institute
Front Royal, Virginia

Judge Joseph Moylan
Omaha, Nebraska

Antonio Agostino Mura
Pisa, Italy

Katsutoyo Nakagawa
Kastsushika-ku, Japan

Nerina Negrello
President, Lega Nazionale Contro la Predazione di Organi e la Morte a cuore Battente
Bergamo, Italy

Dale J. Nelson, M.A., M.S.
Associate Professor of Communication Arts, Mayville State University
Mayville, North Dakota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 23)

Dr. Claude E. Newbury, M.B., B.Ch., D.T. M&H., D.O.H., M.F.G.P.,
D.P.H., D.A., D.C.H., M.Prax. Med.
President, Pro-Life South Africa
Johannesburg, Republic of South Africa

Richard G. Nilges, M.D., FACS
Neurosurgeon
Valparaiso, Indiana

Dr. Peggy Norris, MB Chb, BAO
Chairman, A.L.E.R.T.
Hon. Secretary, Doctors Who Respect Human Life
London, England

Marquis Luigi Coda Nunziante di San Fernando
President, Famiglia Domani
Rome, Italy

Giuseppe Nuzzo
Corporate Legal Representative
Caserta, Italy

David Obeid, M.A.
Co-Founder, Lumen Verum Apologetics
Assistant Editor, Lumen Verum Apologetics
Belfield, Australia

Fr. Denis Edward O’Brien, M.M.
Spiritual Director, American Life League
St. Pius X Church
Dallas, Texas

Matthew B. O’Brien
President, Pro-Life Princeton
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey

John O’Connell
Editor, Catholic Faith
San Francisco, California

David S. Oderberg, B.A., L.L.B, D.Phil.
Reader in Philosophy, University of Reading
Reading, England

Yvonne Odero
True Love Waits—Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya

Dr. Charles O’Donnell, MRCP, DA, EDIC, FFAGM
Consultant in Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine
Whipps Cross Hospital
London, England

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 24)

Martha Ogburn, R.N., M.S.
Director, Eastern Shore Pregnancy Center
Salisbury, Maryland

Prof. Gabriel A. Ojo
Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Ruth D. Oliver, M.D., FRCP(C)
Psychiatrist
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada

Dolores Orlando
Lecture Series Director, Defend Life
Baltimore, Maryland

Jean-Francois Orsini, TOP, Ph.D., KHS
President, St. Antoninus Institute
Washington, DC

Mary Jane Owen, M.S.W., TOP
Executive Director, National Catholic Office for Persons with Disabilities
Washington, DC

John Pacheco
Vice President, Canadian Operations
Catholic Apologetics International
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Frank Padilla
Director, Couples for Christ
Manila, Philippines

Tony C. Palmer, ScD, FRCVS
Veterinary Neurologist
University of Cambridge, England

Terri Palmquist
Tim Palmquist
Founders, Voice for Life
Co-Chairmen, LifeSavers Ministries
Bakersfield, California

Ron Panzer
President, Hospice Patients Alliance
Grand Rapids, Michigan

Eugenio Papotti
Contigliano, Italy

Larry Parsons, M.D.
Family Practice Physician, Board Certified
Omaha, Nebraska

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 25)

Fr. Radoslaw Pawlowski, C.M.
Den Hellige Families Kirke and Sankt Hans Kirke
Birkerød, Denmark

Rod Pead
Editor, Christian Order
London, England

Captain (Ret.) Charles J. Pelletier, II
President, Mother and Unborn Baby Care of Northern Texas
Fort Worth, Texas

Mary Patricia Pelletier
Vice President, Raphael (God Heals) of Northern Texas, Inc.
Fort Worth, Texas

Luca Poli, M.D.
Neurologist
Boselga de Pine
Trento, Italy

Michael Potts, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Methodist College
Fayetteville, North Carolina

Mark Power
Olivia Power
Queensland State Presidents, National Association of Catholic Families
Toowomba, Australia

Patrick Quirk, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Law
Bond University
Gold Coast, Australia

Walter Ramm
Director, AKTION LEBEN, e.V.
Absteinach, Germany

Roberta Ranzato
Padua, Italy

Sam Ratcliffe, Ph.D.
Head, Bywaters Special Collection
Hamon Arts Library
Southern Methodist University
Dallas, Texas

Vittoria Ravagli
Editor, Le Voice della Luna
Sasso Marconi, Italy

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 26)

Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon
Senior Editor, Touchstone
Chicago, Illinois

Theodore P. Rebard, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
University of St. Thomas
Houston, Texas

Adam Redmon
Director, Crossroads
Stafford, Virginia

Fr. Richard J. Rego, S.T.L.
Immaculate Conception Parish
Ajo, Arizona

Marlene Reid
President, Human Life Alliance
St. Paul, Minnesota

Charles E. Rice, LL.M., J.S.D.
Professor Of Law
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana

Fr. George M. Rinkowski
Toledo, Ohio

Fr. Chad Ripperger, F.S.S.P. Ph.D.
Professor of Moral Theology and Philosophy
St. Gregory the Great Seminary
Seward, Nebraska
Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary
Denton, Nebraska

Maria Luisa Robbiati, M.D.
General Medicine and Specialist in Anesthesia and Resuscitation
Rome, Italy

Gelson Luis Roberto
Clinical Psychologist
Associação Brasileira de Etnopsiquiatria e Psiquiatria Social
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Gilson Luis Roberto, M.D.
Clinical Medicine
Medical Clinic
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Margaret Robinson
Timothy Robinson
Coordinators, Belize Catholic Institute for Human Life
Benque Viejo, Belize

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 27)

Fr. Ed Roche, S.O.L.T.
Pastor, Santa Maria de la Esperanza
Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Bonnie Chernin Rogoff
Founder, Jews for Life
New York, New York

Mercedes C. Rohe, R.Ph., B.S.
Retired Pharmacist
Cincinnati, Ohio

Jaqui Rose
Catholic Action Life League
Cape Town, Republic of South Africa

Gerald L. Rowles, Ph.D.
Clinucal Psychologist
Founder and President, Dads Against the Divorce Industry
Johnston, Iowa

Kevin Ryan, Ph.D.
Founder and Director Emeritus, Center for the Advancement of Ethics and Character
Boston University
Boston, Massachusetts

Derek Sakowski,
Seminarian, Pontifical College Josephinum
Columbus, Ohio

Peter W. Salsich, Jr., J.D.
McDonnell Professor of Justice in American Society
Saint Louis University
Saint Louis, Missouri

Pastor Russell E. Saltzman, M.Div.
Editor, Forum Letter
Pastor, Ruskin Heights Lutheran Church
Kansas City, Missouri

Br. John M. Samaha, S.M.
Writer
Retired High School Teacher
Past Officer, Mariological Society of America
Cupertino, California

Arlene Sawicki
Chair, Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women
Co-Director, Vote Life America
Great Barrington, Illinois

Antonio Scacco
Professor, Magistero di Bari
Editorial Director, Rivista Future Shock
Bari, Italy
“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth – Page 28

Rich Scanlon
Executive Director, Human Life Alliance
St. Paul, Minnesota

Michael A. Scaperlanda, J.D.
Edwards Family Professor of Law
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition Ontario
London, Ontario, Canada

Joseph M. Scheidler
Executive Director, Pro-Life Action League
Chicago, Illinois

Robert J. Schihl, Ph.D.
Catholic Apologist
Professor of Communication
Regent University
Virginia Beach, Virginia

Dr. med. Ingolf Schmid-Tannwald
Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics , Medical School
Universitat Munchen
President, Atze fur das Leben e.V.
Munich, Germany

Walter H. Schneider
Founder, Fathers for Life
Bruderheim, Alberta, Canada

Fr. Scott Seethaler, O.F.M. Cap.
Professional Advisory Board, People Concerned for the Unborn Child
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Elida Seguin, Ph.D.
Professor of Law
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Pam Seliga
President, Students for Human Life
University of St. Thomas
St. Paul, Minnesota

Michal Semin
Director, The Civic Insitute
Prague, Czech Republic

Mary Senander
Minneapolis, Minnesota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 29)

Dott. Dario Sepe
Specialist in Liver Diseases and Gastroenterology
Università di Roma
Rome, Italy

Giuseppi Sermonti
Profesor Emeritus of Genetics, Universities of Palermo and Perugia
Editor, Rivista di Biologia
Rome, Italy

Rogerio Passos Severo, MA
Professor of Philosophy of Law and Logic
Faculdades Ritter dos Reis
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Dr. John B. Shea, M.B., B.Ch., FRCP(C)
Past President, Toronto Catholic Doctors Guild
Past President, Canadian Chapter of Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Member of the Board, Catholic Civil Rights League
Associate Editor, Catholic Insight
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Jerome T.Y. Shen, M.D., FAAP
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
St. Louis University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Missouri

Kunihiko Shimamoto
President, Jinrui Aizenkai
Kameoka, Japan

Raimondo Siciliano
High School Teacher
Belluno, Italy

Josephine Siedlecka
Editor, Independent Catholic News
London, England

Saulo Sirena
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Fr. Robertas Gedydas Skrinskas
President, Pro Vita
Kauno, Lithuania

Fr. Kenneth M. Slattery, C.M., Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Philosophy
St. John’s University
Jamaica, New York

Bernadette Smyth
President, Precious Life
Belfast, Northern Ireland
“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 30)

Joseph Sobran
Columnist, The Wanderer
Founder and Editor, Sobran’s
Vienna, Virginia

Dick Sobsey
Professor of Educational Psychology
Director, J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Phyllis A. Sower
Attorney at Law
Co-Founder, Our Lady of Guadalupe Academy
Frankfort, Kentucky

Nair Maria Spessatto
Public Officer
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Fr. Ernest G. Spittler, S.J., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry Emeritus
John Carroll University
University Heights, Ohio

Rev. Paul T. Stallsworth
Editor, Lifewatch
President, Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality
Morehead City, North Carolina

John P. Stanton
Executive Director, Pro-Life Union of Southeastern Pennsylvania
Oreland, Pennsylvania

Donna Steichen
author
Ojai, California

Peggy Stone
mother of “donor” victim Nicholas, age 9
Founder, Silent Hearts
Darling Point, Australia

Thomas Sulivan
President, St. Michael Media
Hudson, Florida

Robert A. Sungenis, M.A.
President, Catholic Apologetics International
Alexandria, Virginia

Leon J. Suprenant, Jr.
President, Catholics United for Faith
Steubenville, Ohio

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 31)

Robert Sutherland
President, Right to Life Association of Thunder Bay and Area
Thunder Bay, Ontario. Canada

Fr. Richard L.B. Sutter, S.S.M.
Web Minister, Anglocatholic Central
Ellicott, Colorado

Thomas S. Taylor
Laurie Balbach Taylor
President, Hope of St. Monica
Milford, Ohio

Fr. Joseph Terra, F.S.S.P.
Chaplain, Latin Mass Community
Sacramento, California

Dr. Pravin Thevatathasan, MRC Psych., MSc.
Consultant Psychiatrist
London, England

Corinne Thomley
President, Illinois Lutherans for Life
Mattoon, Illinois

Msgr. Timothy J. Thorburn
Vicar General, Diocese of Lincoln
Lincoln, Nebraska

Fr. Hugh S. Thwaites, S.J.
Bexhill, England

William J. Tighe, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Muhlenberg College
Allentown, PA

Fr. Stephen Torraco, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Institute for the Study of the Magisterial Teaching of the Church
Associate Professor of Theology
Assumption College
Worcester, Massachusetts

Ugo Tozzini
Civil Engineer
Degree in Religious Science, Pontificia Università della Santa Croce, Rome
Author, Mors tua, Vita mea: Espianto d’organi umani: la morte è un’opinione?
Turin, Italy

Dr. Adrian Treloar, MRCP, MRC Psych.
Consultant and Senior Lecturer in Old Age Psychiatry
Guys, Kings and St. Thomas Hospital
London, England

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 32)

Giovanni Turco
Member, Pontifical Roman Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas
Professor of Philosophy
Instituto Universitario Orientale di Napoli
Naples, Italy

Sue Turner, M.Sci.
Troy, Alabama

Bruce Uditsky, M.Ed.
Executive Director, Alberta Association for Community Living
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Masumi Ugajin
Taitu-Ku, Japan

Leslie J. Unruh
Founder and President, National Abstinence Clearinghouse
Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Dr. Cristina Valea
Predident, Pro Vita Medica
Timasoara, Romania

Sr. Paula Vandegaer, S.S.S., L.C.W.S.
Founder, Scholl Institute of Bioethics
President, International Life Services
Los Angeles, California

Gene Edward Veith, Ph.D.
Director, Cranach Institute
Concordia University-Wisconsin
Mequon, Wisconsin

Dr. Josephine Venn-Treloar, MRCGP
General Practioner
London, England

Prof. Guido Vignelli
Director. SOS Ragazzi
Rome, Italy

Angelo Vigorelli, dr. chem.
Castalpusterlengo, Italy

Debra L. Vinnedge
Director, Children of God for Life
Clearwater, Florida

Fr. Kenneth P. Vinsel III
St. Mary’s Anglican Catholic Church
Denver, Colorado

Dr. Paul Vooht
Stevenage Herts, England
“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 33)

Humprhey Waldock
Barrister
West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Vikki Walton
Writer and Speaker
Board of Directors, Colorado Writers Fellowship
Colorado Springs, Colorado

Dr. Gerald J. Wanjohi
Publisher, WAJIBU: a journal of social and religious concern
Nairobi, Kenya

Fr. Raphael Wanjohi, Ph.D., D. Min.
Professor of Moral Theology and Clinical Psychology
Director, Pro-Life Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya

Matthew Ward
Attorney at Law
Charles Town, West Virginia

Luhra Tivis Warren
Author and Speaker, Christ-Like Ministry
Little Rock, Arkansas

Yoshio Watanabe, M.D., FACC
Professor Emeritus of Medicine, Fujita Health University
Consultant Cardiologist, Chiba Tokushu-kai Hospital
Funabashi, Japan

Dean Weber, C.P.A.
Cincinnati, Ohio

Germaine Wensley, R.N., B.S.
Immediate Past President, California Nurses for Ethical Standards
Los Angeles, California

Juli Loesch Wiley
Founder, Prolifers for Survival
Johnson City, Tennessee

Richard G. Wilkins, J.D.
Professor of Law, J. Rueben Clark Law School
Managing Director, World Family Policy Center
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah

Kieron Wood
Special Advisor, Latin Mass Society of Ireland
Barrister at Law
Dublin, Ireland

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 34)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., Ph.D.
Associate Editor, The Latin Mass
Intructor of History
Suffolk Community College
Brentwood, New York

Laverne Wormley
President, California Lutherans for Life
Chatham, California

Pam Yaksich
High School Principal
Omaha, Nebraska

John Spencer Yantiss
Founder and President, LifeAffirm
Helena, Alabama

Masafumi Yashida
Graduate Student
Suginami-ku, Japan

Francis Young
Centre for Thomistic Studies
Sydney, Australia

Robert V. Young, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Director of Graduate Programs, Department of English
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina

John W.S. Yun, M.D., FRCP(C)
Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology
Richmond Health Science Centre
Richmond, British Columbia, Canada

Fiorenzo Zanette, M.D.
Treviso, Italy

Mary Lynn Ziegler, MSW, LCSW-C
Founder, De Marillac Center
Emmitsburg, Maryland

“Brain Death” — Enemy of Life and Truth

Repercussão na mídia brasileira:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/22/movimento-contesta-uso-do-criterio-da-morte-cerebral-%e2%80%9cbrain-death%e2%80%9d-%e2%80%94-enemy-of-life-and-truth/

Agora, você também pode ser signatário desta importante declaração internacional, acessando o endereço:

http://www.thelifeguardian.org/action=join_us.html

http://www.lifestudies.org/jp/noshihantai.htm

http://www.renewamerica.us/columns/byrne/080625

No link abaixo está a tradução desta declaração para o português com uma introdução que foi veiculada no ano de 2000:

Papers no Japão contra a declaração de morte encefálica:

You can read papers on the anti-brain death movement in Japan on International Networl for Life Studies.

http://www.lifestudies.org/index.html

Pope John Paul II’s August 29, 2000, address to the International Congress of the Transplantation Society has awakened renewed interest in the ongoing controversies surrounding “brain death” and organ transplantation. Inasmuch as these controversies quite literally involve matters of life and death? physical and spiritual, a clear understanding of their nature is vital to the survival of both life and truth, life’s guardian.

Since the question of organ transplantation cannot be properly judged either logically or ethically in the absence of what the Pope describes as “scientifically secure means of identifying the biological signs that a person has indeed died” (4), we must first examine the concept of “brain death,” which serves as the rationalization for the removal of vital organs from those described as “donors.” “Brain Death”

Noting a shift in emphasis in the determination of death “from the traditional cardio-respiratory signs to the ‘so-called’ neurological criterion,” the Holy Father states that this change consists in “establishing, according to clearly determined parameters commonly held by the international scientific community, the complete and irreversible cessation of all brain activity (in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem).” (5)

The parameters variously set forth for declaring a person “brain dead,” however, are neither “clearly determined” nor are they “commonly held” by the scientific community. Rather the myriad permutations of “brain death” criteria introduced since the publication of the revealingly titled “A Definition of Irreversible Coma” in 1968—more than 30 sets in the first decade alone—have grown increasingly permissive. At the same time, a growing number of members of the scientific community have taken a closer look at “brain death” and are voicing their concerns.

To know with moral certainty that “the complete and irreversible cessation of all brain activity (in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem)” has occurred would require the total absence of all circulation and respiration. Confirmation of this absence would necessitate that the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem have been destroyed and the circulatory and respiratory systems as well.

None of the shifting sets of “’so-called’” neurological criterion” for determining death fulfills the Pope’s requirement that they be “rigorously applied” to ascertain “the complete and irreversible cessation of all brain activity” (5) In fact, “brain death” is not death, and death ought not to be declared unless the entire brain and the respiratory and circulatory systems have been destroyed.

Organ Transplantation

Reiterating his words in Evangelium Vitae (86), the Holy Father “suggested that one way of nurturing a genuine Culture of Life ‘is the donation of organs, performed in an ethically acceptable manner.’” (1)

A manner that is “ethically acceptable” is one that corresponds to the Natural Moral Law and its four axioms: (1) Good ought to be done, and evil must be avoided. (2) Good may not be withheld. (3) Evil may not be done, and (4) Evil may not be done that good might come of it.

Thus the harvesting of organs in a manner that would bring about the debilitating mutilation or the death of the “donor” would not be “ethically acceptable.”

Describing the decision to donate an organ quite aptly as ”a decisive gesture,” the Pope cautioned, “The human ‘authenticity’ of such a decisive gesture requires the individuals to be properly informed about the processes involved, in order to be in a position to consent or decline in a free and conscientious manner.” (3) To be properly informed, the person considering organ donation should be educated about the nature of vital organ transplantation. In particular, he should be advised that prior to excision, his heart is healthy and capable of normal circulation and respiration, but after any vital organ necessary and required to live has been moved from his body, he will die. The prospective “donor” should also be informed that a paralyzing agent will be administered to prevent him from moving when the incision is made and advised whether anesthesia will be administered to him prior to the excision of his organs, as has been recommended by anesthesiologists.

Lest freedom be confused with license, it must be noted that freedom consists in the liberty to exercise one’s free will in accordance with right reason, which seeks good and avoids evil. To murder oneself or another can never be in accord with right reason.

The Holy Father makes a critical restriction on the removal of organs in light of “the unique dignity of the human person” stipulating that “vital organs which occur singly in the body can be removed only after death, that is, from the body of someone who is certainly dead.” (4) He goes on to add that “the requirement is self-evident, since to act otherwise would mean intentionally to cause the death of the donor in disposing of his organs.” (4)

For vital organs to be suitable for transplantation, however, they must be living organs removed from living human beings. Moreover, as noted above, persons condemned to death as “brain dead” are not “certainly dead” but, to the contrary, are certainly alive.

Thus adherence to the restrictions stipulated by the Pope—and the prohibitions imposed by God Himself in the Natural Moral Law—precludes the transplantation of unpaired vital organs, an act which causes the death of the “donor” and violates the fifth commandment of the divine Decalogue, “Thou shalt not kill” (Deut. 5:17).

Paul A. Byrne, M.D., FAAP Walt F. Weaver, M.D., FACC
Past President, Catholic Medical Association Clinical Associate Professor, School of Medicine
Oregon, Ohio University of Nebraska
Lincoln, Nebraska

Bernice Jones
Lifeguardian Foundation
Vancouver, WA

Bishop Fabian Wendelin Bruskewitz Bishop Robert F. Vasa
Diocese of Lincoln Diocese of Baker
Lincoln, Nebraska Baker, Oregon

Archbishop Lawrence Saphonophon-Khai Fr. Christian Marie Charlot
Archdiocese of Thare-Nonseng Former Secretary, Pontifical Academy for Life
Sakkonakhon, Thailand President, World for Children
Bagnoregio, Italy

Prof. Josef Seifert, Ph.D. Mercedes Arzú Wilson, L.H.D.
Ordinary Member, Pontifical Academy for Life Ordinary Member, Pontifical Academy for Life
Rector, International Academy for Philosophy President, Family of the
Americas Foundation Furstenstum, Liechtenstein Dunkirk, Maryland

Judie Brown Fr. Thomas Euteneur.
Corresponding Member, Pontifical Academy for Life President, Human Life International
President, American Life League Front Royal, Virginia
Stafford, Virginia

Julie Grimstad Earl E. Appleby, Jr.
Director, Center for the Rights of the Terminally Ill Director, Citizens United Resisting Euthanasia
Stephens, Wisconsin Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 3)

Neleide Abila
Professor of Law, Universidade Paranaense
Guaira, Brazil

Madonna R. Adams. Ph.D.
Past Director, Center for Applied Ethics, Pace University
Instructor in Philosophy, Caldwell College
Caldwell, New Jersey

Lawrence A. Adekoya, kcss
Executive Director/National Organiser, Human Life Protection League
Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria.

Maria Sophia Aguirre, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Economics, Catholic University of America
Washington, DC

Fr. Fred Alexander, S.O.L.T.
General Procurator, Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity
Hythe, England

William B. Allen, Ph.D.
Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan

Jack Ames
Director, Defend Life
Baltimore, Maryland

Mary Jo Anderson
Contributing Editor, Crisis
Washington, DC

Br. Anthony, O.S.F.
Vocation Director, Franciscan Brothers of the Sacred Heart
Vice President, Diocesan Board of Catholic Education and Formation
Fargo, North Dakota

John P. Antony, J.D.
Highland Heights, Kentucky

Marcos Antonio Aranda, M.D.
Director, ICU, and Chief, Department of Pulmonology, Hospital Clinicordis
São Paulo, Brazil

João Araújo, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics, Universidade Alberta
Lisbon, Portugal

Hamilton Reed Armstrong
Sculptor, Writer, Lecturer
Instructor in Art History, International Catholic University
Notre Dame, Indiana

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 4)

Michael Asuzu, M.D.
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University Teaching Hospital
Ibadan, Nigeria

Kathleen O. Balbach
Office Manager, Hope of St. Monica
Milford, Ohio

Marian Banducci
Director, Voice for the Unborn
Modesto, California

Elena Barberis
Social Assistant
Valmadoona, Italy

Carlo Barbieri
Genoa Representative, Famiglia e Civilità
Genoa, Italy

Deacon Roy Barkley, Ph.D.
Senior Editor, Texas State Historical Association
Austin, Texas

Gary L. Bauer
Chairman, Campaign for Working Families
Arlington, Virginia

Michael Bauman, Ph. D.
Professor of Theology and Culture and Director of Christian Studies, Hillsdale College
Hillsdale, Michigan

Dr. Med. Paolo Bavastro
Chief Dr. ICU and Department of Internal Medicine, Filderklinik
Fildestadt, Germany

Richard P. Becker, RN, MS MA
Bethel College
Mishawaka, Indiana

Michael J. Behe, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow, Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture
Seattle, Washington
Professor of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Christopher R. Bell
President, Good Counsel, Inc.
Hoboken, New Jersey

Joan Andrews Bell
Director, PIETA Mission
Hoboken, New Jersey

Dr. Andrew F. Bella
Consultant Physician, Michael Bella Memorial Hospital
Ibadan, Nigeria

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 5)

Yuri Belozorov
Director, Choose Life
Vladivostock, Russia

James Bendell
Attorney at Law
Port Townsend, Washington

J. Brian Benestad, Ph.D.
Corresponding Member, Pontifical Academy for Life
Board of Directors, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Professor of Theology, University of Scranton
Scranton, Pennsylvania

Iain T. Benson B.A. (Hons.), M.A., LLB.
Barrister & Solicitor
Bowen Island, British Columbia, Canada

Fr. Frederick Bentley, OHI
Anglican Priests for Life
Endinboro, Pennsylvania

Paul Bernetsky,
Executive Director, Youth for the Third Millennium
Potomac, Maryland

Robin Bernhoft, M.D., FACS
Chairman, National Parents Commission
Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Andrew Richard Berry
Disability Rights Advocate
London, England

Giuseppe Bertolini, M.D.
Specialist in Anesthesia and Resuscitation, Ospedale Ruiniti di Roma
Rome, Italy

Cledson Ramos Bezerra
Attorney at Law
João Pessoa, Brazil

John F. Billings, J.D.
Attorney at Law
Lexington, Kentucky

Jerrold G. Black, M.D.
Family Practice Physician
Lincoln, Nebraska

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 6)

Karla Bladel, M.D., FACOG
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Vice President, Rock Island County Medical Society
Rock Island, Illinois

John W. Blewett
President Emeritus, The Wanderer Forum Foundation
Managing Editor, The Latin Mass
Ramsey, New Jersey

Stephanie Block
Director, Special Research Projects, The Wanderer Forum Foundation
Hudson, Wisconsin

Marcella K. Boehm
Cincinnati, Ohio

Wallace L. Boever, M.S.
Clinic Manager, Holy Family Medical Specialties
Lincoln, Nebraska

Paul C. Boling, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy and Bible, William Jennings Bryan College
Dayton, Tennessee

Dr. Manuele Bondì
Department of Biological Evolution, Università di Parma
Parma, Italy

Massimo Bondì, M.D., L.D.
Former General Surgeon
Medical Board, Sydney, Australia
Professor of Surgical Pathology, Università degli Studî di Roma “La Sapienza”
Rome, Italy

Deacon Carlo Bonicello
Valmadonna, Italy

Stephen G. Brady
President, Roman Catholic Faithful
Petersburg, Illinois

Gerard V. Bradley, J.D.
Past President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Vice President, American Public Philosophy Institute
Professor of Law, University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana

Fr. Anthony Brankin, S.T.L.
Chaplain, Chicago Chapter, Legatus Foundation
St. Thomas More Church
Chicago, Illinois

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 7)

Dr. Michael Brear, MB, BS, DTM&H, LMCC
General Practitioner
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

William Brennan, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Social Service, St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri

Montague Brown, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology and Chair, Department of Psychology, St. Anselm’s College
Manchester, New Hampshire

Paul R. Bruch, M.D.
Past President, Connecticut Right to Life Corporation
Southbury, Connecticut

Léo Brust
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Rene Josef Bullecer, M.D.
Director. AIDS -Free Philippines. Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines
Health Representative for Asia, Pontifical Council for Pastoral Health Care
Executive Director, HLI-Visayas, Mindanao
Visayas, Philippines

J. Kevin Burke, MSS, LSW
Theresa Karminski Burke, Ph.D.
Founders, Rachel’s Vineyard Ministries
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania

Lilo Cadrin
President, St. Paul Pro-Life Association
St. Paul, Alberta, Canada

Guido Cantamessa, M.D.
Family Practice and Specialist in Anesthesia and Resuscitation
Bergamo, Italy

Rev. Graham Capill, BD, LLB
Party Leader, Christian Heritage Party of New Zealand
Christchurch, New Zealand

Alberto Carosa
Journalist
Rome, Italy

Samuel B. Casey, J.D.
Executive Director and CEO, Christian Legal Society
Annandale, Virginia

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth – Page 8

Keith Cassidy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History, University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Timothy A. Chichester
Executive Director, Yankee Samizdat
Austerlitz, New York

Motoharu Chimori
Onoda, Japan

Helen Cindrich
Executive Director, People Concerned for the Unborn Child
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Charley Clements
Director, Eagle Cross Alliance
Houston, Texas

Greg Clovis
Executive Director, Human Life International-UK
London, England

Kurt Clyne M.S., Pharm.D.
Director, Pharmacy, St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center
Lincoln, Nebraska

Celso Galli Coimbra
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Cicero Galli Coimbra, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Universidade Federal de São Paulo
São Paulo, Brazil

Dr. Anthony P. Cole, FRCP, RFCPCH
Director, Lejeune Clinic
London, England

Kathy Coll
Director, Pro-Life Coalition
Havertown, Pennsylvania

William F. Colliton, Jr., M.D., FACOG
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology, George Washington University
Washington, DC

Anne Costa
Friends for Life, Inc.
Baldwinsville, New York

William Cotter
Chairman, St. Stanislaus Council
President, Operation Rescue: Boston
Milton Village, Massachusetts

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 9)

Fr. Absalom Coutinho
Palmetto, Florida

Catherine T. Coyle, R.N., Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Education, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

Carlito V. Cruz, M.D.
General Surgeon, St. John Hospital and Medical Center
Detroit, Michigan

Gregg Cunningham, J.D.
Executive Director, The Center for Bio-Ethical Reform
Los Angeles, California

Joseph W. Cunningham, Esq.
President, The Society of Blessed Gianna Beretta Molla
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

W. Patrick Cunningham
Principal, Central Catholic High School
San Antonio, Texas

Lorna L. Cvetkovitch, M.D.
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Lincoln, Nebraska

Fr. Thomas Dailey, OSFS, S.T.D,
President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Professor of Theology and Director, Salesian Center of Faith and Culture, DeSales University
Center Valley, Pennsylvania

Mary Davenport, M.D., FACOG
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
El Sobrante, California

Michael Davies
President, International Una Voce Federation
London, England

Camille E. De Blasi, M.A.
Director, Center for Life Principles
Redmond, Washington

Kurenai Deguchi
Spiritual Leader, Oomoto
Kameoka, Japan

Kyotaro Deguchi
Advisor, Oomoto Foundation
Kameoka, Japan

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 10)

Dr. Michael Delany
London, England

Deacon Rafael de los Reyes
Pax Catholic Communications, Archdiocese of Miami
Miami, Florida

Roberto de Mattei
Professor of Modern History, Università degli Studî di Cassino
Cassino, Italy

William A. Dembski, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow, Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture, Discovery Institute
Seattle, Washington
Associate Research Professor in the Conceptual Foundations of Science, Baylor University
Waco, Texas

Fr. Edouard de Mentque, F.S.S.P.
Chaplain, Latin Mass Community
Kansas City, Kansas

Robert Desmond, M.D.
Emergency Department, Wood County Hospital
Bowling Green, Ohio

Raymond J. de Souza
Catholic Apologist and Founder, St. Gabriel’s Communications
Forrestfield, Australia

Robert A. Destro, J.D.
Professor of Law and Director, Interdisciplinary Program in Religion and Law
Columbus School of Law, Catholic University of America
Washington, DC

Fr. Alphonse de Valk, c.s.b.
Editor and Publisher, Catholic Insight
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Donald K. DeWolf, J.D.
Senior Fellow, Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture, Discovery Institute
Seattle, Washington
Professor of Law, Gonzaga University School of Law
Spokane, Washington

Marie Dietz
Director, Center for Pro-Life Studies
North Troy, Vermont

John R. Diggs, Jr., M.D.
Medical Board, National Abstinence Clearinghouse
Sioux Falls, South Dakota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 11)

Bernard Dobranski, J.D.
Vice-President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Dean and Professor of Law, Ave Maria Law School
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Chiara Donati
Ravenna, Italy

David J. Dooley, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of English, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto
Associate Editor, Catholic Insight
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Dr. Bert P. Dorenbos
President, Schreeuw Om Leven
Hilversum, Netherlands

John F. Downs
Director, Partners in the Cross
Mt. Jackson, Virginia

Jim Dowson
National Organizer, Precious Life Scotland
Cumbernauld, Scotland

Tim Drake
Journalist, National Catholic Register
St. Cloud, Minnesota

Thomas A. Drolesky, Ph.D.
Publisher and Editor, Christ or Chaos
Cincinnati, Ohio

Christina Dunigan
Writer and Researcher
Former Pro-Life Guide, About.com
Baltimore, Maryland

Lloyd J. Duplantis, Jr., P.D.
President Emeritus, Pharmacists for Life International
Gray, Louisiana

Sr. Lucille Durocher
Founder, St. Joseph’s Workers for Life & Family
Vanier, Ontario, Canada

Cheryl Eckstein
Founder and President, Compassionate Healthcare Network
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada

Reinhold Eichinger
Founder, Pro Life Data Exchange/Börse für das Leben
Duesseldorf, Germany

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 12)

Charbel El-Chaar
Director, St. Charbel for Life
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Kenneth G. Elzinga, Ph.D., L.H.D.
Professor of Economics, University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia

Randy Engel
President, The Michael Fund International Foundation for Genetic Research
Export, Pennsylvania

Robert D. Enright, Ph.D.
Professor of Human Development, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

David Wainwright Evans, M.D., FRCP
Fellow Commoner of Queens’ College
Cambridge, England

H. Martyn Evans, Ph.D.
Director Emeritus, Center for Philosophy and Health Care, University of Swansea
Swansea, Wales

Joseph C. Evers, M.D., FAAP
Pediatrician
McLean, Virginia

Timothy R. Fangman, M.D., FACC
Cardiovascular Medicine
Omaha, Nebraska

Sydney O. Fernandes, M.D., M.B.B.S., F.C.P.S., ABIM, ABFP
Internal Medicine
Oregon, Ohio

Vera Maria Vargas Ferreira
Attorney
Porto Alegre, Brazil

J. Fraser Field
Executive Officer, Catholic Educator’s Resource Center
Powell River, British Columbia, Canada

James P. Finnegan
Co-Director, Vote Life America
Barrington, Illinois

Timothy H. Fisher, M.D.
Family Practice Physician
Lincoln, Nebraska

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 13)

Fr. Gregoire J. Fluet, Ph.D. candidate
Pastor, St Bridget of Kildare
Moodus, Connecticut

Frank J. Forlini Jr. M.D.
Cardiologist
Director, Cardiovascular Institute of Northwestern Illinois
Rock Island, Illinois

David F. Forte, J.D.
Professor of Law, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

Jeffrey L. Fortenberry, M.S., M.A.
Member, Lincoln City Council
Lincoln, Nebraska

Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Humanities, Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia

Nelson Fragelli
Director, Droit de Naître
Paris, France

Sheila Franco
Geologist
Niterói, Brazil

Winston L. Frost, LL.M.
Dean, Trinity Law School
Santa Ana, California

Luigi Gagliardi, M.D.
Head Physician, Department of Thoracic Surgery (retired)
Ospedale Forlanini di Roma
Professor Emeritus
Università degli Studî di Roma ‘La Sapienza’
Rome, Italy

Fr. Daniel Gauthier, o.ff.m.
Pastor, St. Margaret of Scotland Church
North Lancaster, Ontario, Canada

Sean Marie Gertz, Esq.
Tony Gertz
Attorney at Law
Reading, Ohio

Brian Gibson
Executive Director, Pro-Life Action Ministries
St. Paul, Minnesota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 14)

Maciej Giertych, Ph.D., D.Sc.
Chairman, Department of Genetics, Institute of Dendrology, Polska Akademia Nauk
Kórnik, Poland

Camille Giglio
Director, California Right to Life
Pleasant Hill, California

Jennifer Ann Gigowski
Jerry Thomas Gigowski
Founders, Life Is Precious Ministries
Indianapolis, Indiana

Fr. Patrick Gillooly
Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

Steve Gilmore
Charlotte, North Carolina

Corrado Gnerre
Professor of Religion, Instituti Scienze Religiose ‘Giovanni Paolo II’ di Foggia
Foggia, Italy

Gentil Gonçales Filho
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Pontificia Universidade Católica de Campinas
Campinas, Brazil

Marcelo A. González
Executive Editor, Panorama Católico Internacional
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Fr. James E. Goode, OFM, Ph.D.
President, National Black Catholic Apostolate for Life
New York, New York

Giuseppe Gori
Leader, Family Coalition Party of Ontario
Stoufville, Ontario, Canada

Carlo Govoni, M.D.
Surgeon and Specialist in Ear and Throat and 1st Level Director, Ospedale di Verbania
Verbania, Italy

Alice Ann Grayson
Founder and President, Veil of Innocence
Catasauqua, Pennsylvania

Samuel Gregg, D.Phil.
Director, Center for Economic Personalism, Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty
Grand Rapids, Michigan

Fr. Benedict J. Groeschel, C.F.R., Ed. D.
Director, Office for Spiritual Development, Archdiocese of New York
Larchmont, New York

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 15)

Karel F. Gunning, M.D.
President, World Federation of Doctors Who Respect Human Life
Rotterdam, Netherlands

Fr. Matthew Habiger, O.S.B., Ph.D.
Board of Directors, Human Life International
Front Royal, Virginia

Emil Hagamu
Chairman, Pro-Life Tanzania
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Lucy Hancock, Ph.D.
Consultant, World Bank
Washington, DC

Mark Harrington
Executive Director, The Center for Bio-Ethical Reform—Midwest
Westerville, Ohio

Denny Hartford
Director, Vital Signs Ministries
Omaha, Nebraska

Charles Harvey
Contributing Editor, Envoy
Steubenville, Ohio

Lucky M. Hatta
Founder and President, Pro Life Indonesia
Turangga Bandung, Indonesia

The Rt. Rev. Mark Haverland, Ph.D.
Bishop Ordinary, Diocese of the South
Anglican Catholic Church
Athens, Georgia

Paul L. Hayes, M.D., FACOG
Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Lincoln, Nebraska

Les Hemingway, M.D.
Family Physician
Morlane, Australia

Carlos Heredia F.
Commercial Engineer
Professor Emeritus, Universidad de Cuenca
Professor Emeritus, Universidad del Azuay
Cuenca, Ecuador “Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 16)

Jerome B. Higgins, D.V.M.
Chairman, Long Island Coalition for Life
Ronkonkoma, New York

David J. Hill, M.A., FRCA
Emeritus Consultant Anesthetist
Cambridge, England

Jonathan Hill
Chairman, Massachusetts Reform Party
New Bedford, Massachusetts

Yasumi Hirose
Honorary President, Jinuri Aizenkai
Kameoka, Japan

Helen Hull Hitchcock
Director, Women for Faith & Family
St. Louis, Missouri

James Hitchcock, Ph.D.
Senior Editor, Touchstone
Past President, Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Professor of History, St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri

Benno Hofschulte
Director, Aktion SOS LEBEN
Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Terence J. Hughes, Ph.D.
Professor of Geological Sciences and Quaternary and Climate Studies, University of Maine
Orono, Maine

Glenn M. Hultgren, D.C.
Chairman, Christian Bioethics Awareness Committee
Founder and Executive Secretary, Christian Chiropractors Association
Fort Collins, Colorado

Rachel Hurst
Director, Disability Awareness in Action
London, England

Thomas Hutte, M.D.
Surgeon, A.C.S.
Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky

John J. Jakubczyk
Board of Directors, National Lawyers Association
President, Arizona Right to Life
Phoenix, Arizona

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 17)

The Reverend Canon Eric Jarvis, M.A.
Canon Emeritus, Cathedral Church of St. Peter and St. Wilfrid
Ripon, England

Marianne M. Jennings, J.D.
Professor of Legal and Ethical Studies and Director, Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, Arizona State University
Phoenix, Arizona

Fr. David Albert Jones, O.P., M.A.
Director, Linacre Centre for Healthcare Ethics
London, England

Derek L. Jones
Councillor, Deal Town Council
Deal, England

Michael M. Jordan, Ph.D.
Kirk Professor in English and Director, American Studies Program, Hillsdale College
Hillsdale, Michigan

Anthony M. Kam, M.D., FACS
Chief of Staff, Sheridan Community Hospital
Sheridan, Michigan

Dr. med. Claudia Kaminski
Chairman, Aktion Lebensrecht für Alle e.V.
Chairman, Bundesverband Lebensrecht (BVL)
Düsseldorf, Germany

George Byron Kerford, Ph.D.
Chairman and CEO, World Association of Persons with disAbilities
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Genevieve S. Kineke
Editor, Canticles
Host, Women in the Church Today
Executive Director, Catholic Alliance of Women
East Greenwich, Rhode Island

Andreas Kirchmair
President, Werk für menschenwuerdige Therapieformen
Senior Consultant
Graz, Austria

Nelson D. Kloosterman, Th.D.
Professor of Ethics and New Testament, Mid-America Reformed Seminary
Dyer, Indiana

M.A. Klopotek, Dr. Eng. Habil.
Professor, Institute of Computer Sciences, Akademia Polska
Siedice, Poland “Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth – Page 18

Mary Ann Kreitzer
President, Les Femmes
Vienna, Virginia

Al Kresta
CEO, Ave Maria Radio
Host, Kresta in the Afternoon
Executive Editor, Credo
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Mary Ann Kuharski
Director, Prolife Across America
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Arthur M. Kunath, M.D., LTCΒUSAR (ret.)
Rheumatologist, Kunath, Burte, Temming, M.D. PSC
Covington, Kentucky

Paul Lagan
President, Alliance for Life Ministries
Madison, Wisconsin

Thomas Langan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, University of Toronto
President, Catholic Civil Rights League
Toronto, Canada

Jerome L’Ecuyer, M.D., FAAP
Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
St. Louis University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Missouri

Charles T. Lester, Jr.
Attorney at Law
Ft. Thomas, Kentucky

Marco Lettieri
Natale Lettieri
Ombretta, Italy

Fr. Robert J. Levis, Ph.D.
Co-Host, The Web of Faith, EWTN
Spiritual Director, Fraternitas Marialis Regina Cleri
Vice President, Confraternity of Catholic Clergy
Erie, Pennsylvania

Thomas H. Lieser, M.D., MPH, FACOEM
Board Certified, Family Practice and Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Adjunct Faculty, Medical College of Ohio
Toledo, Ohio

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 19)

James Likoudis
Past President, Catholics United for the Faith
Montour Falls, New York

Felice Livi, M.D.
Rome, Italy

Greg P. Lloyd, M.A.
Executive Director, National Coalition of Clergy and Laity
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Pat Lohman
Director, AAAWomen for Choice of Manassas Pregnancy Center
Manassas, Virginia

Stephen B. Lopez, Esq.
Board of Directors, National Lawyers Association
Founder and Board of Directors, Life Legal Defense Foundation
President and CEO, Light Horse Ventures, LLC
San Francisco, California

Rudolph M. Lohse
Faithful Catholics of Central Florida
Orlando, Florida

Dr. med. Johann Loibner
General Practitioner
Graz, Austria

Luiz Anderson Lopes, M.D.
Pediatric Department, Escola Paulista de Medicina
Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Professor of Pediatrics, Universidade de Santo Amoro
São Paulo, Brazil

Nicholas J. Lowry
Secretary, Latin Mass Society of Ireland
Editor, Brandsma Review
Dun Loaghaire, Ireland

Daniel Lynch
Judge
Director, Apostolates of the Missionary Image and Jesus King of All Nations
St. Albans, Vermont

Rev. Patrick Mahoney
Director, Christian Defense Coalition
Washington, DC

David P. Marciniak, R.N.
Host, Seek First
WLOF-FM
Buffalo, New York “Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 20)

Gordon Marino, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Director, Hong/Kierkegaard Library, St. Olaf College
Northfield, Minnesota

Honorable Bob Marshall
Member, Virginia House of Delegates—13th District
Manassas, Virginia

Curtis Martin
President, Fellowship of Catholic University Students
Greeley, Colorado

Fr. Paul Marx, O.S.B., Ph.D.
Founder, Human Life International
Founder, Population Research Institute
Collegeville, Minnesota

Satou Masahiko
Journalist
Sapporo, Japan

Kouji Matsumoto
Editor, INOCHI Journal
Kobe, Japan

Maria Cristina Mattioli
Judge, 15th Circuit Federal Labor Court
Campinas, Brazil

Fr. Daniel Maurer, C.J.D.
Canons Regular of Jesus the Lord
Vladivostok, Russia

Hermengild J. Mayunga
Executive Director, Care of the Needy
Mwanza, Tanzania

Msgr. John F. McCarthy, J.C.D., S.T.D.
Editor, Living Tradition
Director General, The Society of the Oblates of Wisdom
Eastman, Wisconsin

John McCarthy, Q.C.
President, St. Thomas More Society
Sydney, Australia

Kathleen B. McCormick
Newport, Kentucky

Dr. Patricia McEwen
Ministry Coordinator, Life Coalition International
Melbourne Florida

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 21)

Patricia McKeever B.Ed. M.Th.
Editor, Catholic Truth
Kilsyth, Scotland

Teresa McKenna, M.D., FRCA, FRCP(C)
Anesthetist
Markham, Ontario. Canada

Daphne McLeod
Chairman, Ecclesia et Pontifice
Great Bookham, England

Fr. James McLucas
Editor in Chief, The Latin Mass
Ramsey, New Jersey

Jay McNally
Trustee, Call to Holiness
Managing Editor, Credo
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Philip D. McNeely, M.D.
Family Practice Physician
Lincoln, Nebraska

Mary S. Meade, Esq. *
Executive Director, The Natural Law Center
Falls Church, Virginia

Walter Menz
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

The Rt. Rev. Robert W.S. Mercer, CR
Diocesan Bishop, Anglican Catholic Church of Canada
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Clare McGrath Merkle
Editor, The Cross and the Veil
St. Clement’s Bay, Maryland

Fr. Daniel Meynen
Author
Host, Homily Service
Jambes, Belgium

Niamh Nic Mhathuna
Chairwoman, Mother and Child Campaign, Youth Defence
Dublin, Ireland

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 22)

Daniel Michael
Co-Coordinator, Small Victories, NFP
Highland, Illinois

Mark Miravale, Ph.D., S.T.D.
Professor of Theology, Franciscan University
Steubenville, Ohio

Brian Moccia, RRT
Registered Respiratory Therapist (retired), St. Joseph’s Health Centre
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Charles Molineaux
President, The Brent Society
Arlington, Virginia

Maria Giuliani Monica
San Andrea do Sorbello, Italy

Dr. Orestes P. Monzon
Professor and Chairman, Division of Radiological Sciences, Santo Tomas University Hospital
Manila, Philippines

Fr. James Morrow
Humane Vitae House
Braemar, Scotland

Steven W. Mosher
President, Population Research Institute
Front Royal, Virginia

Judge Joseph Moylan
Omaha, Nebraska

Antonio Agostino Mura
Pisa, Italy

Katsutoyo Nakagawa
Kastsushika-ku, Japan

Nerina Negrello
President, Lega Nazionale Contro la Predazione di Organi e la Morte a cuore Battente
Bergamo, Italy

Dale J. Nelson, M.A., M.S.
Associate Professor of Communication Arts, Mayville State University
Mayville, North Dakota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 23)

Dr. Claude E. Newbury, M.B., B.Ch., D.T. M&H., D.O.H., M.F.G.P.,
D.P.H., D.A., D.C.H., M.Prax. Med.
President, Pro-Life South Africa
Johannesburg, Republic of South Africa

Richard G. Nilges, M.D., FACS
Neurosurgeon
Valparaiso, Indiana

Dr. Peggy Norris, MB Chb, BAO
Chairman, A.L.E.R.T.
Hon. Secretary, Doctors Who Respect Human Life
London, England

Marquis Luigi Coda Nunziante di San Fernando
President, Famiglia Domani
Rome, Italy

Giuseppe Nuzzo
Corporate Legal Representative
Caserta, Italy

David Obeid, M.A.
Co-Founder, Lumen Verum Apologetics
Assistant Editor, Lumen Verum Apologetics
Belfield, Australia

Fr. Denis Edward O’Brien, M.M.
Spiritual Director, American Life League
St. Pius X Church
Dallas, Texas

Matthew B. O’Brien
President, Pro-Life Princeton
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey

John O’Connell
Editor, Catholic Faith
San Francisco, California

David S. Oderberg, B.A., L.L.B, D.Phil.
Reader in Philosophy, University of Reading
Reading, England

Yvonne Odero
True Love Waits—Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya

Dr. Charles O’Donnell, MRCP, DA, EDIC, FFAGM
Consultant in Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine
Whipps Cross Hospital
London, England

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 24)

Martha Ogburn, R.N., M.S.
Director, Eastern Shore Pregnancy Center
Salisbury, Maryland

Prof. Gabriel A. Ojo
Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Ruth D. Oliver, M.D., FRCP(C)
Psychiatrist
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada

Dolores Orlando
Lecture Series Director, Defend Life
Baltimore, Maryland

Jean-Francois Orsini, TOP, Ph.D., KHS
President, St. Antoninus Institute
Washington, DC

Mary Jane Owen, M.S.W., TOP
Executive Director, National Catholic Office for Persons with Disabilities
Washington, DC

John Pacheco
Vice President, Canadian Operations
Catholic Apologetics International
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Frank Padilla
Director, Couples for Christ
Manila, Philippines

Tony C. Palmer, ScD, FRCVS
Veterinary Neurologist
University of Cambridge, England

Terri Palmquist
Tim Palmquist
Founders, Voice for Life
Co-Chairmen, LifeSavers Ministries
Bakersfield, California

Ron Panzer
President, Hospice Patients Alliance
Grand Rapids, Michigan

Eugenio Papotti
Contigliano, Italy

Larry Parsons, M.D.
Family Practice Physician, Board Certified
Omaha, Nebraska

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 25)

Fr. Radoslaw Pawlowski, C.M.
Den Hellige Families Kirke and Sankt Hans Kirke
Birkerød, Denmark

Rod Pead
Editor, Christian Order
London, England

Captain (Ret.) Charles J. Pelletier, II
President, Mother and Unborn Baby Care of Northern Texas
Fort Worth, Texas

Mary Patricia Pelletier
Vice President, Raphael (God Heals) of Northern Texas, Inc.
Fort Worth, Texas

Luca Poli, M.D.
Neurologist
Boselga de Pine
Trento, Italy

Michael Potts, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Methodist College
Fayetteville, North Carolina

Mark Power
Olivia Power
Queensland State Presidents, National Association of Catholic Families
Toowomba, Australia

Patrick Quirk, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Law
Bond University
Gold Coast, Australia

Walter Ramm
Director, AKTION LEBEN, e.V.
Absteinach, Germany

Roberta Ranzato
Padua, Italy

Sam Ratcliffe, Ph.D.
Head, Bywaters Special Collection
Hamon Arts Library
Southern Methodist University
Dallas, Texas

Vittoria Ravagli
Editor, Le Voice della Luna
Sasso Marconi, Italy

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 26)

Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon
Senior Editor, Touchstone
Chicago, Illinois

Theodore P. Rebard, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
University of St. Thomas
Houston, Texas

Adam Redmon
Director, Crossroads
Stafford, Virginia

Fr. Richard J. Rego, S.T.L.
Immaculate Conception Parish
Ajo, Arizona

Marlene Reid
President, Human Life Alliance
St. Paul, Minnesota

Charles E. Rice, LL.M., J.S.D.
Professor Of Law
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana

Fr. George M. Rinkowski
Toledo, Ohio

Fr. Chad Ripperger, F.S.S.P. Ph.D.
Professor of Moral Theology and Philosophy
St. Gregory the Great Seminary
Seward, Nebraska
Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary
Denton, Nebraska

Maria Luisa Robbiati, M.D.
General Medicine and Specialist in Anesthesia and Resuscitation
Rome, Italy

Gelson Luis Roberto
Clinical Psychologist
Associação Brasileira de Etnopsiquiatria e Psiquiatria Social
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Gilson Luis Roberto, M.D.
Clinical Medicine
Medical Clinic
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Margaret Robinson
Timothy Robinson
Coordinators, Belize Catholic Institute for Human Life
Benque Viejo, Belize

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 27)

Fr. Ed Roche, S.O.L.T.
Pastor, Santa Maria de la Esperanza
Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Bonnie Chernin Rogoff
Founder, Jews for Life
New York, New York

Mercedes C. Rohe, R.Ph., B.S.
Retired Pharmacist
Cincinnati, Ohio

Jaqui Rose
Catholic Action Life League
Cape Town, Republic of South Africa

Gerald L. Rowles, Ph.D.
Clinucal Psychologist
Founder and President, Dads Against the Divorce Industry
Johnston, Iowa

Kevin Ryan, Ph.D.
Founder and Director Emeritus, Center for the Advancement of Ethics and Character
Boston University
Boston, Massachusetts

Derek Sakowski,
Seminarian, Pontifical College Josephinum
Columbus, Ohio

Peter W. Salsich, Jr., J.D.
McDonnell Professor of Justice in American Society
Saint Louis University
Saint Louis, Missouri

Pastor Russell E. Saltzman, M.Div.
Editor, Forum Letter
Pastor, Ruskin Heights Lutheran Church
Kansas City, Missouri

Br. John M. Samaha, S.M.
Writer
Retired High School Teacher
Past Officer, Mariological Society of America
Cupertino, California

Arlene Sawicki
Chair, Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women
Co-Director, Vote Life America
Great Barrington, Illinois

Antonio Scacco
Professor, Magistero di Bari
Editorial Director, Rivista Future Shock
Bari, Italy
“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth – Page 28

Rich Scanlon
Executive Director, Human Life Alliance
St. Paul, Minnesota

Michael A. Scaperlanda, J.D.
Edwards Family Professor of Law
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition Ontario
London, Ontario, Canada

Joseph M. Scheidler
Executive Director, Pro-Life Action League
Chicago, Illinois

Robert J. Schihl, Ph.D.
Catholic Apologist
Professor of Communication
Regent University
Virginia Beach, Virginia

Dr. med. Ingolf Schmid-Tannwald
Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics , Medical School
Universitat Munchen
President, Atze fur das Leben e.V.
Munich, Germany

Walter H. Schneider
Founder, Fathers for Life
Bruderheim, Alberta, Canada

Fr. Scott Seethaler, O.F.M. Cap.
Professional Advisory Board, People Concerned for the Unborn Child
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Elida Seguin, Ph.D.
Professor of Law
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Pam Seliga
President, Students for Human Life
University of St. Thomas
St. Paul, Minnesota

Michal Semin
Director, The Civic Insitute
Prague, Czech Republic

Mary Senander
Minneapolis, Minnesota

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 29)

Dott. Dario Sepe
Specialist in Liver Diseases and Gastroenterology
Università di Roma
Rome, Italy

Giuseppi Sermonti
Profesor Emeritus of Genetics, Universities of Palermo and Perugia
Editor, Rivista di Biologia
Rome, Italy

Rogerio Passos Severo, MA
Professor of Philosophy of Law and Logic
Faculdades Ritter dos Reis
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Dr. John B. Shea, M.B., B.Ch., FRCP(C)
Past President, Toronto Catholic Doctors Guild
Past President, Canadian Chapter of Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
Member of the Board, Catholic Civil Rights League
Associate Editor, Catholic Insight
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Jerome T.Y. Shen, M.D., FAAP
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
St. Louis University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Missouri

Kunihiko Shimamoto
President, Jinrui Aizenkai
Kameoka, Japan

Raimondo Siciliano
High School Teacher
Belluno, Italy

Josephine Siedlecka
Editor, Independent Catholic News
London, England

Saulo Sirena
Attorney at Law
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Fr. Robertas Gedydas Skrinskas
President, Pro Vita
Kauno, Lithuania

Fr. Kenneth M. Slattery, C.M., Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Philosophy
St. John’s University
Jamaica, New York

Bernadette Smyth
President, Precious Life
Belfast, Northern Ireland
“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 30)

Joseph Sobran
Columnist, The Wanderer
Founder and Editor, Sobran’s
Vienna, Virginia

Dick Sobsey
Professor of Educational Psychology
Director, J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Phyllis A. Sower
Attorney at Law
Co-Founder, Our Lady of Guadalupe Academy
Frankfort, Kentucky

Nair Maria Spessatto
Public Officer
Porto Alegre, Brazil

Fr. Ernest G. Spittler, S.J., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry Emeritus
John Carroll University
University Heights, Ohio

Rev. Paul T. Stallsworth
Editor, Lifewatch
President, Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality
Morehead City, North Carolina

John P. Stanton
Executive Director, Pro-Life Union of Southeastern Pennsylvania
Oreland, Pennsylvania

Donna Steichen
author
Ojai, California

Peggy Stone
mother of “donor” victim Nicholas, age 9
Founder, Silent Hearts
Darling Point, Australia

Thomas Sulivan
President, St. Michael Media
Hudson, Florida

Robert A. Sungenis, M.A.
President, Catholic Apologetics International
Alexandria, Virginia

Leon J. Suprenant, Jr.
President, Catholics United for Faith
Steubenville, Ohio

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 31)

Robert Sutherland
President, Right to Life Association of Thunder Bay and Area
Thunder Bay, Ontario. Canada

Fr. Richard L.B. Sutter, S.S.M.
Web Minister, Anglocatholic Central
Ellicott, Colorado

Thomas S. Taylor
Laurie Balbach Taylor
President, Hope of St. Monica
Milford, Ohio

Fr. Joseph Terra, F.S.S.P.
Chaplain, Latin Mass Community
Sacramento, California

Dr. Pravin Thevatathasan, MRC Psych., MSc.
Consultant Psychiatrist
London, England

Corinne Thomley
President, Illinois Lutherans for Life
Mattoon, Illinois

Msgr. Timothy J. Thorburn
Vicar General, Diocese of Lincoln
Lincoln, Nebraska

Fr. Hugh S. Thwaites, S.J.
Bexhill, England

William J. Tighe, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Muhlenberg College
Allentown, PA

Fr. Stephen Torraco, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Institute for the Study of the Magisterial Teaching of the Church
Associate Professor of Theology
Assumption College
Worcester, Massachusetts

Ugo Tozzini
Civil Engineer
Degree in Religious Science, Pontificia Università della Santa Croce, Rome
Author, Mors tua, Vita mea: Espianto d’organi umani: la morte è un’opinione?
Turin, Italy

Dr. Adrian Treloar, MRCP, MRC Psych.
Consultant and Senior Lecturer in Old Age Psychiatry
Guys, Kings and St. Thomas Hospital
London, England

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 32)

Giovanni Turco
Member, Pontifical Roman Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas
Professor of Philosophy
Instituto Universitario Orientale di Napoli
Naples, Italy

Sue Turner, M.Sci.
Troy, Alabama

Bruce Uditsky, M.Ed.
Executive Director, Alberta Association for Community Living
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Masumi Ugajin
Taitu-Ku, Japan

Leslie J. Unruh
Founder and President, National Abstinence Clearinghouse
Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Dr. Cristina Valea
Predident, Pro Vita Medica
Timasoara, Romania

Sr. Paula Vandegaer, S.S.S., L.C.W.S.
Founder, Scholl Institute of Bioethics
President, International Life Services
Los Angeles, California

Gene Edward Veith, Ph.D.
Director, Cranach Institute
Concordia University-Wisconsin
Mequon, Wisconsin

Dr. Josephine Venn-Treloar, MRCGP
General Practioner
London, England

Prof. Guido Vignelli
Director. SOS Ragazzi
Rome, Italy

Angelo Vigorelli, dr. chem.
Castalpusterlengo, Italy

Debra L. Vinnedge
Director, Children of God for Life
Clearwater, Florida

Fr. Kenneth P. Vinsel III
St. Mary’s Anglican Catholic Church
Denver, Colorado

Dr. Paul Vooht
Stevenage Herts, England
“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 33)

Humprhey Waldock
Barrister
West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Vikki Walton
Writer and Speaker
Board of Directors, Colorado Writers Fellowship
Colorado Springs, Colorado

Dr. Gerald J. Wanjohi
Publisher, WAJIBU: a journal of social and religious concern
Nairobi, Kenya

Fr. Raphael Wanjohi, Ph.D., D. Min.
Professor of Moral Theology and Clinical Psychology
Director, Pro-Life Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya

Matthew Ward
Attorney at Law
Charles Town, West Virginia

Luhra Tivis Warren
Author and Speaker, Christ-Like Ministry
Little Rock, Arkansas

Yoshio Watanabe, M.D., FACC
Professor Emeritus of Medicine, Fujita Health University
Consultant Cardiologist, Chiba Tokushu-kai Hospital
Funabashi, Japan

Dean Weber, C.P.A.
Cincinnati, Ohio

Germaine Wensley, R.N., B.S.
Immediate Past President, California Nurses for Ethical Standards
Los Angeles, California

Juli Loesch Wiley
Founder, Prolifers for Survival
Johnson City, Tennessee

Richard G. Wilkins, J.D.
Professor of Law, J. Rueben Clark Law School
Managing Director, World Family Policy Center
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah

Kieron Wood
Special Advisor, Latin Mass Society of Ireland
Barrister at Law
Dublin, Ireland

“Brain Death”—Enemy of Life and Truth (Page 34)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., Ph.D.
Associate Editor, The Latin Mass
Intructor of History
Suffolk Community College
Brentwood, New York

Laverne Wormley
President, California Lutherans for Life
Chatham, California

Pam Yaksich
High School Principal
Omaha, Nebraska

John Spencer Yantiss
Founder and President, LifeAffirm
Helena, Alabama

Masafumi Yashida
Graduate Student
Suginami-ku, Japan

Francis Young
Centre for Thomistic Studies
Sydney, Australia

Robert V. Young, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Director of Graduate Programs, Department of English
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina

John W.S. Yun, M.D., FRCP(C)
Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology
Richmond Health Science Centre
Richmond, British Columbia, Canada

Fiorenzo Zanette, M.D.
Treviso, Italy

Mary Lynn Ziegler, MSW, LCSW-C
Founder, De Marillac Center
Emmitsburg, Maryland

Join Us:

http://www.thelifeguardian.org/action=join_us.html

Médicos: Novo Código Deontológico de Portugal permite aborto apenas para “preservar” vida da gestante

Comentário do remetente:

A legislação que permite o aborto até os dez meses de gravidez entrou em vigor em Portugal em 15 de julho de 2007, mas o Novo Código Deontológico da Ordem dos Médicos de Portugal, editado em 13 de janeiro de 2009, apenas autoriza o médico a interromper a gravidez para preservar a vida da gestante, como é o caso também no Brasil. Esta decisão, na prática, torna o aborto em Portugal sem permissão para a profissão médica a não ser no caso excepcionado.

Logo, naquele país, apenas foi legalizado mesmo o aborto feito por pessoas de fora do meio médico. Ficou mais seguro ou ficou muito mais perigoso abortar em Portugal? A resposta é evidente, e sem precisar examinar questões de agressão à saúde relacionadas com a prática do aborto supostamente “seguro” que seria feito por médicos.

A legalização do aborto em Portugal defrontou-se com uma derrota impossível de ser revertida.

Celso Galli Coimbra

OABRS 11352


Lisboa, 13 Jan (Lusa) – O médico deve “guardar o respeito pela vida humana desde o momento do seu início”, mas pode recorrer ao aborto para “preservar” a vida da grávida, segundo o Código Deontológico da profissão publicado hoje em Diário da República.

O mesmo documento da Ordem dos Médicos refere que o “uso de meios extraordinários de manutenção da vida não deve ser iniciado ou continuado contra a vontade do doente”, explicitando não se considerarem como “meios extraordinários” a hidratação e a alimentação.

Ao médico fica “vedada a ajuda ao suicídio, a eutanásia e a distanásia”.

O Código Deontológico anterior referia que “constituem falta deontológica grave quer a prática do aborto quer a prática da eutanásia”.

No artigo 56.º do documento hoje publicado, referente à interrupção da gravidez, lê-se que o respeito pela vida humana “não impede a adopção de terapêutica que constitua o único meio capaz de preservar a vida da grávida ou resultar de terapêutica imprescindível instituída a fim de salvaguardar a sua vida”.

A actual lei, cuja regulamentação entrou em vigor a 15 de Julho de 2007, permite a Interrupção Voluntária da Gravidez (IVG) até às dez semanas.

Sobre a morte, é referido que o suporte artificial de funções vitais deve ser “interrompido após o diagnóstico do tronco cerebral”, exceptuando as situações para colheita de órgãos para transplante.

Os meios “extraordinários” para manter a vida devem ser interrompidos nos “casos irrecuperáveis de prognóstico seguramente fatal e próximo, quando da continuação de tais terapêuticas não resulte benefício para o doente”,

“O uso de meios extraordinários de manutenção da vida não deve ser iniciado ou continuado contra a vontade do doente”, define ainda o documento.

A hidratação e a alimentação, mesmo quando administrados artificialmente, “não se consideram meios extraordinários da vida”, assim como a “administração por meios simples de pequenos débitos de oxigénio suplementar”.

Quanto à objecção de consciência, o documento impõe novos procedimentos, sublinhando que “deverá ser comunicada à Ordem, em documento registado, sem prejuízo de dever ser imediatamente comunicada ao doente ou a quem no seu lugar prestar o consentimento”.

Segundo o novo Código, “a objecção de consciência não pode ser invocada quando em situação urgente e com perigo de vida ou grave dano para a saúde, se não houver outro médico disponível a quem o doente possa recorrer”.

Tanto o actual como o anterior texto referem que “o médico tem o direito de recusar a prática de acto da sua profissão quando tal prática entre em conflito com a sua consciência, ofendendo os seus princípios éticos, morais, religiosos, filosóficos ou humanitários”.

PL/CMP.
2009-01-13 15:50:02

Redefinindo morte: um novo dilema ético – publicado em 19 de janeiro de 2009, na Revista American Medical News

__
Assista:
__

Endereço neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/19/redefindo-morte-um-novo-dilema-etico/

Redefining death: A new ethical dilemma

To secure life-saving vital organs, some physicians are pushing the boundaries of what constitutes death. The ramifications for the transplant system could be profound.


By Kevin B. O’Reilly, AMNews staff. Posted Jan. 19, 2009.

Comentário suscinto sobre a matéria publicada hoje: para assegurar a vida dos órgãos vitais com maior viabilidade para transplantação (que precisam ser retirados no menor espaço de tempo possível em conflito com o esgotamento de recursos terapêuticos para o traumatizado encefálico severo e do qual [esgotamento de recursos] depende a sobrevivência deste último), médicos estão ultrapassando os limites do que se constitui a morte encefálica. As consequências para o sistema transplantador podem ser profundas.No Brasil, esta conduta constitui-se em homicídio culposo ou homicídio por dolo eventual.Celso Galli Coimbra
OABRS 11352

Leia mais nos diversos endereços que estão na página:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/05/transplantes-revista-dos-anestesistas-recomenda-em-editorial-realizacao-de-anestesia-geral-nos-doadores-para-que-nao-sintam-dor-durante-a-retirada-de-seus-orgaos-se-estao-mortos-para-que-a-recomend/


 


A days-old infant sustained severe neurological injury after being asphyxiated during birth, but the dying baby’s condition did not meet the criteria for brain death — long the only circumstance under which vital organs were procured. The baby was transferred to Children’s Hospital in Aurora, Colo., a suburb of Denver, where the family decided to withdraw life support. Family members also agreed to let surgeons there attempt to transplant the baby’s heart into an infant born with complex congenital heart disease.

But to accomplish this, the potential donor heart had to stop working. The question: How long after cardiac functioning ceased should the retrieval team wait to ensure the baby’s heart would not restart without intervention? The complicating factors: Odds of successful transplantation decrease as the wait after cessation of cardiocirculatory function increases. But acting too soon can make retrieval seem like death by organ donation.

The Denver team waited 75 seconds.

The infant who received that heart lived, as did two other babies who received hearts from donations retrieved shortly after cardiac death in transplants the Denver team performed between May 2004 and May 2007. The results were published in the Aug. 14, 2008, New England Journal of Medicine.

The clinical debate over whether 75 seconds without cardiac function after withdrawing life support is sufficient time to confidently declare death is unsettled, but the questions these cases raise go even deeper. Some bioethicists and physicians say the cases are merely the latest in the organ transplantation era to stretch the definition of death in ways that could potentially undermine Americans’ trust in physicians and in the organ donation process.

A matter of minutes

Expanding the pool of potential pediatric heart donors beyond those who meet brain-death criteria can help meet a pressing need. About 100 infants younger than a year old receive life-saving heart transplants every year. But as many as 50 infants in need of heart transplants die each year while waiting on the United Network for Organ Sharing list, according to an NEJM editorial.

About a third of infants who die in pediatric hospitals do so after life support is withdrawn. These infants represent a valuable pool of life-saving organs. The Denver team said that at Children’s Hospital, 12 potential infant donors died of cardiocirculatory causes during the three years of the study, accounting for a possible 70% increase in organ donation.

 

About 100 infants younger than 1 receive heart transplants each year.

 

According to the “dead-donor rule” adopted as law in all 50 states, patients must be declared irreversibly dead before their vital organs can be retrieved for transplantation, provided there is consent from patients or surrogate decision-makers.

Securing organs from brain-dead patients has been deemed ethical since a Harvard Medical School committee formulated the criteria in 1968; every state recognizes brain death as legal death.

Over the last decade and a half, organ donation after cardiac death has become medically and legally acceptable, though the timing question has proved contentious. The so-called Pittsburgh protocol, published in 1993, called for a two-minute wait after cardiopulmonary arrest before declaring death and retrieving organs. The Institute of Medicine in 1997 said transplant teams should wait five minutes after cardiac functioning ceases before retrieving organs.

Then in 2000, the IOM said some data suggested a shorter interval of 60 seconds, though its report said “existing empirical data cannot confirm or disprove a specific interval at which the cessation of cardiopulmonary function becomes irreversible.” The Society of Critical Care Medicine recommends a wait of at least two minutes but no longer than five minutes.

American Medical Association policy doesn’t address the time issue, but says the practice is “ethically acceptable” as long as conflict-of-interest and palliative care protocols are followed.

In its first infant heart donor case, the Colorado team waited three minutes. But the Children’s Hospital ethics committee determined, based on data it reviewed, that a 75-second wait would be sufficient and would reduce the risk of injury to the donor heart from blood loss.

 

Each year about 50 infants die waiting for heart transplants.

 

This groundbreaking decision has received fierce criticism, including a series of editorials published in the NEJM. A member of the Children’s Hospital ethics committee declined to speak with AMNews.

But the author of one editorial derided as “arbitrary” the 75-second protocol the Colorado team used. “We know that infants, compared to older people, tend to be more resilient,” said James L. Bernat, MD, professor of medicine and neurology at the Dartmouth Medical School in New Hampshire. “We are always more conservative in our delineations with infants. It’s especially troubling that they reached that conclusion.”

The process of deciding how long to wait before declaring cardiac death “shouldn’t be done ad hoc,” he said. “It should be something done following guidelines. There are some guidelines out there; admittedly, there could be better ones. I understand why they wanted to shorten the wait, but I don’t think it’s a good idea.”

Bioethicist Arthur L. Caplan, PhD, agreed. “I’m not against moving fast and saving other lives. But the big ‘but’ is you have to do that with a national consensus, not local groups saying when it comes to neonates 75 seconds is plenty of time to wait,” said Caplan, director of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioethics.

Other critics said the concept of transplanting a heart after cardiac death isn’t logical.

“If someone is pronounced dead on the basis of irreversible loss of heart function, after all, it would not be possible for heart function to be restored in another body,” wrote Robert M. Veatch, PhD, a Georgetown University medical ethics professor, in an Aug. 14, 2008, NEJM essay. “One cannot say a heart is irreversibly stopped if, in fact, it will be restarted.”

Veatch said the dead-donor rule should be changed to allow patients or their families to opt for a standard that takes a loss of functioning consciousness (short of brain death) as another kind of death. Physicians could then procure hearts “in the absence of irreversible heart stoppage.”

Various definitions

Robert D. Truog, MD, said the Denver cases illustrate the underlying problem in how death is defined to facilitate organ donation and transplantation. He said it is time to reconsider the dead-donor rule.

“The existing paradigm, built around the dead-donor rule, has increasingly pushed us into more and more implausible definitions of death, until eventually we end up with such a tortured definition that nobody’s going to believe it,” said Dr. Truog, professor of medical ethics and anesthesia at Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts.

“When you get there, you run the risk of really undermining confidence in what this whole system is about,” he said.

“We are seeing it play out in the Denver example,” he added. “What made it problematic was that they were trying to fit what they did into our existing ethical norms. It’s like trying to fit square pegs in round holes. It just doesn’t fit.”

Dr. Truog has long argued for what he admits is a “radical departure” from the current definition of norms for death. He disagrees that brain death is actual death, noting that major life functions continue. Brain-dead patients have given birth, for example.

Dr. Troug argues that vital organ donation does cause patients to die, and to say otherwise misleads patients and families. But dying patients on life support and their families have a right to consent to such donations, even if it causes death, he said.

While the debate over the timing of cardiac death is contentious, most experts disagree with Dr. Truog’s opinion on the dead-donor rule.

“The dead-donor rule serves a great purpose,” said John J. Paris, a Boston College bioethicist. “There is a great sentiment among people that [physicians] might try to do you in to take your organs. … The protection is we only take organs from those who are dead and can’t take organs to cause them to be dead, which is a substantial leap from where we are. And the slippery slope is very slippery in that case. If you don’t have to be dead to get the organs, then from whom can we take them?”

Dr. Truog said no transplants should take place without consent from patients or their surrogates, and such donations should be limited to patients whose surrogates want to discontinue life support.

That standard is not good enough for Georgetown’s Veatch.

He said Dr. Truog’s proposal “amounts to an endorsement of active, intentional killing of the patient — that is, active euthanasia. It would be euthanasia by vital organ removal.”

The Denver heart transplant cases already have sparked a contentious debate over how soon is too soon to declare death. Whether physicians, bioethicists and lawmakers will be spurred to redefine death remains to be seen.

Franklin G. Miller, PhD, said it is unlikely. He has co-authored articles with Dr. Truog that call for doing away with the dead-donor rule.

He predicted that “we can just muddle through” with the current definitions of death.

Miller, a bioethicist at the National Institutes of Health, said “people will get bent out of shape” by critiques of the dead-donor rule. “But I think we need, in a way, to get bent out of shape to make sense out of what we’re already doing.”

The print version of this content appeared in the Jan. 26, 2009 issue of American Medical News.

A dura realidade do tráfico de órgãos


Artigo do Jornalista Geraldo Lopes

Hoje quero falar de um tema que quase não é abordado pela grande imprensa: o tráfico de órgãos humanos. É muito comum a mídia descer o pau, quando trata de crimes das classes menos favorecida. Nos finais de tarde, quase todas as emissoras de tevê exibem programas policiais de qualidade duvidosa. Seus apresentadores não poupam agressões verbais, na maioria das vezes ridículas, quando o foco está voltado para o ladrão, para o assaltante, para o seqüestrador ou o traficante de drogas. Acompanho esses programas sempre que posso, não por gostar do conteúdo, mas por dever de ofício e nunca vi nenhum dos acalorados apresentadores usar a mesma veemência verbal quando o acusado é alguém com formação acadêmica ou oriundo de classe abastada.

O tráfico de órgãos humanos é um crime especial, e como tal, não envolve o traficante da favela ou o ladrão da periferia. As quadrilhas organizadas são compostas de gente especializada, principalmente da área de saúde e a mídia em geral, não ataca doutores com a mesma facilidade que o faz com ladrões, assaltantes ou traficantes. A polícia, por sua vez, também trata de forma diferenciada, a artista de televisão que roubou a bolsa da companheira numa academia de ginástica e o ladrão que tentou surrupiar a bolsa de uma senhora no sinal de trânsito. Quando a questão envolve médicos, advogados e outros supostos detentores de Drs então, nem se fala. É o caso do tráfico de órgãos humanos, onde as quadrilhas exigiriam o envolvimento de médicos, que escondidos sob seus jalecos brancos, agiriam na quase certeza da impunidade.

A afirmação não é leviana e nem se trata de elucubrações ou de achismos. Ela deve constar dos anais da Câmara dos Deputados e faz parte do pronunciamento do deputado Neucimar Fraga (PF-ES), em 8 de maio de 2003. O parlamentar diz textualmente o seguinte:

“Ocupo a tribuna para tratar de tema que me tem chamado a atenção nos últimos dias: o tráfico de órgãos humanos, que tem deixado cicatrizes no coração de muitos em nosso país, atemorizando a população brasileira e provocando em pessoas e entidades reações assustadoras.

Temos recebido diversas denúncias de pessoas que foram vítimas de verdadeiras quadrilhas que matam inocentes para retirar seus órgãos. Há casos registrados no Estado de Minas Gerais, nas cidades de Poços de Caldas e Belo Horizonte.

As vítimas que tiveram coragem de denunciar a máfia do transplante e do tráfico de órgãos no país hoje se tornaram vilões. Não estamos denunciando traficantes ou usuários de drogas de favelas, mas sim, médicos e donos de hospitais, pessoas conceituadas, autoridades constituídas.

Na cidade de Taubaté foi instaurado inquérito policial em decorrência de denúncia feita pelo Diretor do Hospital Universitário, que delatou seus próprios colegas por tráfico de órgãos humanos dentro do hospital. O Ministério Público indiciou quatro médicos do estabelecimento por homicídio doloso. Pessoas foram assassinadas dentro da unidade hospitalar para tráfico de seus órgãos no Estado de São Paulo.

Em Belo Horizonte houve o caso da universitária Tais, de 21 anos de idade, que tendo sido atropelada, foi levada à coma induzido. Queremos fazer uma denúncia: 90 por cento dos casos de morte encefálica corridos nos hospitais brasileiros poderiam ser evitados. Em vez de serem resgatadas e terem nova oportunidade de vida, pessoas estão sendo assassinadas nos leitos hospitalares brasileiros para o abastecimento do tráfico de órgãos.

Nossa legislação proíbe a eutanásia. Nem mesmo a família tem autorização para determinar à equipe médica o desligamento ou não de aparelhos para que a pessoa com morte cerebral morra dignamente. No entanto, a mesma legislação que proíbe a eutanásia, permite a retirada de órgãos de pacientes em estado terminal com morte encefálica. Como pode a lei, que considera crime o desligamento de aparelhos que mantenham vivo o doente terminal, permitir a retirada dos olhos, dos rins, do coração ou do fígado desse paciente? Ou seja, mata parceladamente a pessoa.

A Comissão de Segurança Pública e Combate do Crime Organizado da Câmara dos Deputados, acatando requerimento deste deputado, criou grupo de trabalho para investigar o tráfico de órgãos humanos no país. Esse grupo já se reuniu três vezes. Estamos colhendo informações e já temos em mãos documentos e depoimentos de delegados e de promotores que comprovam essa prática criminosa no país. Nós, como deputados, representantes da população, não nos podemos furtar à responsabilidade de investigar as ações desses grupos criminosos.

Há, por exemplo, o caso de um médico que matou treze crianças no Maranhão e foi preso no meu Estado, o Espírito Santo, trabalhando num hospital conveniado do SUS. Ele conseguiu uma credencial que lhe permitiu continuar cometendo crimes em outros Estados.”

A denuncia oficial do deputado Neucimar Fraga, do PF do Espírito Santo na Câmara Federal, pode sinalizar para um rigor maior do CRM – Conselho Regional de Medicina – de cada Estado, no sentido de monitorar com maior rigor, o trabalho desenvolvido pelos profissionais da área de saúde. Nos bastidores da Câmara, comenta-se que outros parlamentares estariam juntando documentos que comprovam a prática antiética de endocrinologistas que estariam ministrando drogas viciantes a pacientes com problemas de obesidade para mantê-los presos ao tratamento interminável. A ser comprovada essa denúncia, o profissional de saúde deveria receber o mesmo tratamento do traficante que vende o produto em portas de escolas com o objetivo de aumentar o número de viciados e expandir o consumo drogas ilícitas.

O deputado capixaba Neucimar Fraga, garante, ao final do pronunciamento, que a Comissão de Segurança Pública da Câmara dos Deputados, trabalhará arduamente para que esses assuntos sejam esclarecidos. A população que vive sob tensão permanente diante da sensação de medo imposta pelo recrudescimento da violência, tem mais uma preocupação aterrorizante: a possibilidade de entrar num hospital para tratamento e se transformar em mais uma vítima de quadrilhas especializadas no tráfico de órgãos humanos.


Leia também:

Morte encefálica: o teste da apnéia somente é feito se houver a intenção de matar o paciente

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/11/morte-encefalica-o-teste-da-apneia-somente-e-feito-se-houver-a-intencao-de-matar-o-paciente/

Anencefalia, morte encefálica, o Conselho Federal de Medicina e o STF

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/anencefalia-morte-encefalica-e-o-conselho-federal-de-medicina/

Transplantes: Revista dos Anestesistas recomenda em Editorial realização de anestesia geral nos doadores para que não sintam dor durante a retirada de seus órgãos. Se estão mortos para que a recomendação de anestesia geral?

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/05/transplantes-revista-dos-anestesistas-recomenda-em-editorial-realizacao-de-anestesia-geral-nos-doadores-para-que-nao-sintam-dor-durante-a-retirada-de-seus-orgaos-se-estao-mortos-para-que-a-recomend/

Morte Suspeita – Editorial do Jornal do Brasil de 01.03.1999, Caderno Brasil, página 08

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/editoriais-morte-encefalica/page/4/

Seminário sobre Morte Encefálica e Transplantes de 20.05.2003 na Assembléia Legislativa do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/14/seminario-sobre-morte-encefalica-e-transplantes-de-20052003-na-assembleia-legislativa-do-estado-do-rio-grande-do-sul/


QUESTIONAMENTO INTERPELATÓRIO AO CFM:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=149

INTRODUÇÃO ÀS RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=150

RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=151

RÉPLICA A ESTAS RESPOSTAS COM NOVE ANEXOS E CARTAS DE AUTORIDADES EM SAÚDE:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=108


http://www.mundolegal.com.br/?FuseAction=Artigo_Detalhar&did=12525

Seminário sobre Morte Encefálica e Transplantes de 20.05.2003 na Assembléia Legislativa do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul

Endereço desta publicação:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/14/seminario-sobre-morte-encefalica-e-transplantes-de-20052003-na-assembleia-legislativa-do-estado-do-rio-grande-do-sul/

Endereço da íntegra do Seminário neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/seminario2003-1c.pdf

 

Fato histórico. Pela primeira vez, desde a concepção da morte encefálica em 1968 pela Harvard Medical School, ocorreu um debate aberto ao público sobre o assunto com a presença oficial do Conselho Federal de Medicina.Como resultado desse debate, no dia 16 de agosto de 2003, o Plenário da Assembléia Legislativa do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul aprovou recomendação às autoridades nacionais fiscalizatórias da saúde pública para que revisassem a declaração de morte encefálica no Brasil e seu protocolo na Resolução 1.480/97 do Conselho Federal de Medicina, especialmente quanto ao uso do teste da apnéia nele previsto, que é feito sem o conhecimento da família do futuro doador de órgãos vitais únicos.

O Ministério Público Federal, onde tramita igual questionamento técnico-neurológico e jurídico, não enviou representante.

 

 

Celso Galli Coimbra,
OABRS 11352,
cgcoimbra@gmail.com

Outras referências sobre o mesmo assunto:

Artigo publicado na Revista Ciência Hoje, número 161

Expressamente proíbida a reprodução deste artigo em qualquer publicação eletrônica ou não.

Endereço deste artigo neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/08/falhas-no-diagnostico-de-morte-encefalica-valor-terapeutico-da-hipotermia/

Editorial da Revista Ciência Hoje, número 161:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/editoriais-morte-encefalica/page/3/

Artigo original: https://biodireitomedicina.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/revista-ciencia_hoje-morte-encefalica.pdf

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/editoriais-morte-encefalica/page/2/

Editorial da Revista dos Anestesistas do Royal College of Anaesthetists da Inglaterra, de maio de 2000:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/05/transplantes-revista-dos-anestesistas-recomenda-em-editorial-realizacao-de-anestesia-geral-nos-doadores-para-que-nao-sintam-dor-durante-a-retirada-de-seus-orgaos-se-estao-mortos-para-que-a-recomend/

Leia também no site da UNIFESP:

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/apnea.htm

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/mortencefalica.htm

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/brdeath.html

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/opinioes.htm

Revista de Neurociência da UNIFESP, de agosto de 1998:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/04/morte-encefalica-um-diagnostico-agonizante-artigo-de-0898-da-revista-de-neurociencia-da-unifesp/

Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research (1999) 32: 1479-1487 ISSN 0100-879X – “Implications of ischemic penumbra for the diagnosis of brain death”:

http://www.scielo.br/pdf/bjmbr/v32n12/3633m.pdf

Revista BMJ –British Medical Journal – debate internacional onde não foi demonstrada a validade dos critérios declaratóricos de morte vigentes:

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/320/7244/1266

Morte encefálica: o teste da apnéia somente é feito se houver a intenção de matar o paciente

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/11/morte-encefalica-o-teste-da-apneia-somente-e-feito-se-houver-a-intencao-de-matar-o-paciente/

Morte encefálica: carta do Professor Flavio Lewgoy

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/3/

A morte encefálica é uma invenção recente

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/4/

Morte encefálica: A honestidade é a melhor política

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/5/

Morte encefálica: O temor tem fundamento na razão

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/6/

Morte encefálica: Carta do Dr. César Timo-Iaria dirigida ao CFM acusando os erros declaratórios deste prognóstico de morte

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/13/morte-encefalica-carta-do-dr-cesar-timo-iaria-dirigida-ao-cfm-acusando-os-erros-declaratorios-deste-prognostico-de-morte/

Referências correlacionadas:

QUESTIONAMENTO INTERPELATÓRIO AO CFM:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=149

INTRODUÇÃO ÀS RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=150

RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=151

RÉPLICA A ESTAS RESPOSTAS COM NOVE ANEXOS E CARTAS DE AUTORIDADES EM SAÚDE:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=108

A change of heart and a change of mind? Technology and the redefinition of death in 1968

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VBF-3SWVHNF-R&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=45715d0a00629ba39456d22a891613e6

Sessão Plenária da Assembléia Legislativa do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul


“O teste de apnéia, muitas vezes, pode significar a morte ou o homicídio de um cidadão.”

Íntegra do Seminário:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/14/seminario-sobre-morte-encefalica-e-transplantes-de-20052003-na-assembleia-legislativa-do-estado-do-rio-grande-do-sul/

35ª Sessão Ordinária, em 21 de Maio de 2003

Endereço para citação, referência deste texto neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/14/sessao-plenaria-da-assembleia-legislativa-do-estado-do-rio-grande-do-sul/

Endereço em www.biodireito-medicina.com.br

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/assembleia.asp?idAssembleia=157


“Essa Comissão tem o objetivo de debater os seguintes temas: origens, características e fundamentos da bioética; doação de órgãos e tecidos; regulamentação da clonagem no Brasil; clones, aspectos biológicos e éticos; bioética e reprodução humana; diagnóstico pré-natal; transgenia – produção de alimentos e nutrição; eutanásia; filiações de homossexuais – natural e adoção; recursos genéticos; biopirataria.”

“Estiveram aqui nada mais nada menos do que as maiores autoridades brasileiras no assunto: o Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra, neurologista atuando profissionalmente em São Paulo, que recentemente recebeu o título de Médico do Ano pela Universidade de Cambridge e participou do Congresso Internacional de Neurologia em Barcelona; o Dr. Solimar Pinheiro da Silva, neurologista, Vice-Presidente da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina; o Dr. Volnei Garrafa, Doutor em Bioética pela Universidade de Roma e Presidente da Bioética Internacional; o Dr. Sandro Schmitz dos Santos, membro da Cruz Vermelha brasileira, assessor da Cruz Vermelha belga e membro colaborador da Comissão de Direitos Humanos da Ordem dos Advogados do Brasil; e o Dr. Celso Coimbra, advogado.”

“Debate-se doação de órgãos sempre sob a ótica do transplantado, e não se levam em conta os procedimentos relacionados àqueles que doam parte do seu corpo para transplante.”

“Na verdade, a Lei não prevê a vontade do doador, que não é respeitada no momento da remoção dos órgãos; quer dizer, se um familiar emite uma opinião contrária à do doador, essa vontade passa a não ser respeitada.”

“No Brasil, a mídia atribui muita importância a quem recebe o órgão – e esse também merece a nossa consideração –, mas se esquece de quem doou.”

“O teste de apnéia, muitas vezes, pode significar a morte ou o homicídio de um cidadão.”

“O plenarinho estava lotado, e lá se encontravam grandes figuras do Brasil inteiro para debater a bioética, a ética da vida, por iniciativa da Comissão Especial para Tratar da Bioética.”

Informação da Editoria de Biodireito-Medicina sobre os registros feitos nesta Sessão Plenária da Assembléia Legislativa do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul: o conteúdo a que é feito referência está todo ele neste saite em “Seminário Morte Encefálica”, para consulta e documentação.

Presidência dos Deputados Vilson Covatti, Márcio Biolchi, Manoel Maria e César Busatto

Às 14h15min, o Sr. Vilson Covatti assume a direção dos trabalhos.

O SR. PRESIDENTE VILSON COVATTI (PPB) – Havendo número regimental e invocando a proteção de Deus, declaro abertos os trabalhos da presente Sessão.

(…)

GRANDE EXPEDIENTE

(…)

O SR. GIOVANI CHERINI (PDT) – Sr. Presidente, Sras. e Srs. Deputados: Estranhamente, uma reunião realizada ontem nesta Casa não teve nenhuma repercussão, e é para falar sobre este que foi um dos eventos mais importantes já ocorridos neste Parlamento que ocupo esta tribuna.

O plenarinho estava lotado, e lá se encontravam grandes figuras do Brasil inteiro para debater a bioética, a ética da vida, por iniciativa da Comissão Especial para Tratar da Bioética.

Essa Comissão tem o objetivo de debater os seguintes temas: origens, características e fundamentos da bioética; doação de órgãos e tecidos; regulamentação da clonagem no Brasil; clones, aspectos biológicos e éticos; bioética e reprodução humana; diagnóstico pré-natal; transgenia – produção de alimentos e nutrição; eutanásia; filiações de homossexuais – natural e adoção; recursos genéticos; biopirataria.

No Seminário de ontem, debatemos especialmente a doação de órgãos, a morte encefálica e a eutanásia.

Estiveram aqui nada mais nada menos do que as maiores autoridades brasileiras no assunto: o Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra, neurologista atuando profissionalmente em São Paulo, que recentemente recebeu o título de Médico do Ano pela Universidade de Cambridge e participou do Congresso Internacional de Neurologia em Barcelona; o Dr. Solimar Pinheiro da Silva, neurologista, Vice-Presidente da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina; o Dr. Volnei Garrafa, Doutor em Bioética pela Universidade de Roma e Presidente da Bioética Internacional; o Dr. Sandro Schmitz dos Santos, membro da Cruz Vermelha brasileira, assessor da Cruz Vermelha belga e membro colaborador da Comissão de Direitos Humanos da Ordem dos Advogados do Brasil; e o Dr. Celso Coimbra, advogado.

Um dos pontos discutidos foi o teste de apnéia, que dividiu opiniões nesse Seminário de Bioética.

Há uma divergência grande quanto à melhor técnica para testar a morte encefálica. Alguns consideram isso um homicídio, e o debate, logicamente, ficou em torno da realização do teste de apnéia como meio para diagnosticar a morte do paciente com trauma craniano severo. Essa técnica prevê o desligamento do aparelho respiratório por até 10 minutos, para verificar se o doente tem capacidade de respirar sem a ajuda das máquinas.

O que disse o Dr. Cícero Coimbra? Que o teste de apnéia induz o paciente à morte, na medida em que, ao ser utilizado, não testa anteriormente a capacidade respiratória do indivíduo, resultando na liberação de ácido no sangue e no aumento da queda da pressão arterial, que pode causar danos colaterais irreversíveis ao paciente. O Dr. Coimbra condenou a legislação médica, que não prevê a autorização dos familiares para a realização do teste de apnéia, fundamental para o diagnóstico.

Debate-se doação de órgãos sempre sob a ótica do transplantado, e não se levam em conta os procedimentos relacionados àqueles que doam parte do seu corpo para transplante.

O Dr. Celso Coimbra afirmou que não há consenso da classe médica sobre o assunto. No seu entendimento, essa é uma prática homicida a partir do momento em que não há a comunicação do médico ao seu paciente e a seus familiares sobre tal procedimento. Essa autorização, segundo ele, está reprimida no art. 133 do Código de Ética Médica, que proíbe o médico de divulgar os conhecimentos científicos à sociedade. Afirmou ainda que esse artigo contradiz a Constituição Federal, que garante à população o total conhecimento dos procedimentos médicos. Uma resolução não pode estar acima da legislação federal, criticou.

Segundo o Dr. Volnei Garrafa, há falhas na Lei que regula os transplantes de órgãos no Brasil, e já existe comércio de órgãos, especialmente de rins. São suas as palavras: A Lei foi votada em 1997, na mesma semana do projeto da reeleição do Presidente da época, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, e não pôde ser discutida, o que resultou em duas grandes falhas.

Na verdade, a Lei não prevê a vontade do doador, que não é respeitada no momento da remoção dos órgãos; quer dizer, se um familiar emite uma opinião contrária à do doador, essa vontade passa a não ser respeitada.

No Brasil, a mídia atribui muita importância a quem recebe o órgão – e esse também merece a nossa consideração –, mas se esquece de quem doou.

O teste de apnéia, muitas vezes, pode significar a morte ou o homicídio de um cidadão. Obrigado.

(…)

Solicito ao Secretário que proceda à chamada dos Deputados para a verificação de quórum.

O Sr. Secretário – Bancada do PT: Deputados Adão Villaverde (ausente); Dionilso Marcon, presente; Edson Portilho, presente; Elvino Bohn Gass, presente; Estilac Xavier, presente; Fabiano Pereira, presente; Flávio Koutzii, presente; Frei Sérgio, presente; Ivar Pavan (ausente); Luis Fernando Schmidt, presente; Raul Pont, presente; Ronaldo Zülke (ausente); Sérgio Stasinski, presente.

Bancada do PPB: Deputados Adolfo Brito, presente; Jair Soares, presente; Jerônimo Goergen, presente; João Fischer, presente; José Farret, presente; Leila Fetter, presente; Marco Peixoto, presente; Pedro Westphalen, presente; Telmo Kirst, presente; Vilson Covatti, presente.

Bancada do PMDB: Deputados Alexandre Postal, presente; Elmar Schneider (ausente); Fernando Záchia, presente; Janir Branco, presente; João Osório (ausente); Márcio Biolchi, presente; Marco Alba, presente; Maria Helena Sartori, presente; Nelson Härter, presente.

Bancada do PDT: Deputados Adroaldo Loureiro, presente; Floriza dos Santos, presente; Gerson Burmann, presente; Giovani Cherini, presente; João Luiz Vargas (ausente); Osmar Severo (ausente); Paulo Azeredo (ausente); Vieira da Cunha, presente.

Bancada do PTB: Deputados Abílio dos Santos (ausente); Edemar Vargas (ausente); Eliseu Santos, presente; Iradir Pietroski, presente; Manoel Maria, presente.

Bancada do PPS: Deputados Berfran Rosado (ausente); Bernardo de Souza (ausente); Cézar Busatto, presente.

Bancada do PSDB: Deputados Paulo Brum (ausente); Ruy Pauletti (ausente); Sanchotene Felice (ausente).

Bancada do PSB: Deputados Heitor Schuch, presente.

Bancada do PFL: Deputado Marlon Santos (ausente).

Bancada do PC do B: Deputada Jussara Cony (ausente).

Estiveram presentes a esta Sessão os seguintes Parlamentares:

Bancada do PT: Deputados Adão Villaverde; Dionilso Marcon; Edson Portilho; Elvino Bohn Gass; Estilac Xavier; Fabiano Pereira; Flávio Koutzii; Frei Sérgio; Ivar Pavan; Luis Fernando Schmidt; Raul Pont; Ronaldo Zülke; Sérgio Stasinski.

Bancada do PPB: Deputados Adolfo Brito; Jair Soares; Jerônimo Goergen; João Fischer; José Farret; Leila Fetter; Marco Peixoto; Pedro Westphalen; Telmo Kirst; Vilson Covatti.

Bancada do PMDB: Deputados Alexandre Postal; Elmar Schneider; Fernando Záchia; Janir Branco; João Osório; Márcio Biolchi; Marco Alba; Maria Helena Sartori; Nelson Härter.

Bancada do PDT: Deputados Adroaldo Loureiro; Floriza dos Santos; Gerson Burmann; Giovani Cherini; Osmar Severo; Vieira da Cunha.

Bancada do PTB: Deputados Eliseu Santos; Iradir Pietroski; Manoel Maria.

Bancada do PPS: Deputados Berfran Rosado; Cézar Busatto.

Bancada do PSDB: Deputados Ruy Pauletti; Sanchotene Felice.

Bancada do PSB: Deputado Heitor Schuch.

Bancada do PFL: Deputado Marlon Santos.

Bancada do PC do B: Deputada Jussara Cony.

Bancada do PL: Deputado Sérgio Peres.

http://www.al.rs.gov.br/plen/SessoesPlenarias/visualiza.asp?ID_SESSAO=54

Festinha estatal regada a diesel

Cristiane Prizibisczki   
13/01/2009, 22:00
 
 
Representantes de entidades envolvidas na diminuição do teor de enxofre no diesel que roda no país – Ministério Público Federal, Petrobras, Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA) e Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental de São Paulo (Cetesb) – estiveram reunidos na manhã desta terça (13) para a apresentação de um “balanço dos primeiros dias de fornecimento de diesel” com 50 partes por milhão de enxofre, que passou a circular em ônibus urbanos de Rio de Janeiro e São Paulo no primeiro dia do ano. Pelo tom amistoso e pelo clima de “comemoração”, não era possível saber que, há apenas alguns meses, tais entidades estavam envolvidas em briga ferrenha.
 
Continue a leitura em

Morte encefálica: Carta do Dr. César Timo-Iaria dirigida ao CFM acusando os erros declaratórios deste prognóstico de morte

Vedada a reprodução dos comentários e da Carta. O endereço para citação, referência ou leitura neste espaço deve ser reproduzido como link ativo:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/13/morte-encefalica-carta-do-dr-cesar-timo-iaria-dirigida-ao-cfm-acusando-os-erros-declaratorios-deste-prognostico-de-morte/

em www.biodireito-medicina.com.br

ele é:


A missão dos médicos: Carta do Dr. César Timo-Iaria ao CFM denunciando a invalidade dos critérios declaratórios da morte encefálica e a retirada de órgãos vitais únicos feita com base nesta declaração sem o esgotamento dos recursos terapêuticos neurológicos em favor do paciente potencial doador destes órgãos. Documento protocolado no Ministério Público Federal e na CPI do Tráfico de Órgãos com a Réplica às respostas do Conselho Federal de Medicina ao questionamento técnico neurológico oposto por mais de uma centena de cidadãos brasileiros a este Órgão Gestor Médico, em junho de 2000 — e cuja resposta foi cobrada pelo MPF apenas no ano de 2003 sob insistência do advogado firmatário, com a entrega das mesmas no final daquele ano. O questionamento oposto em 2000, esclarecia como o teste da apnéia mata a maioria dos pacientes traumatizados encefálicos, com a utilização do teste da apnéia determinado no Protocolo da Morte Encefálica (Resolução CFM 1480/97).  Protocolo no Ministério Público Federal: SCA/000793/2004 de 01.03.2004.

Referências correlacionadas a esta carta:

QUESTIONAMENTO INTERPELATÓRIO AO CFM:

INTRODUÇÃO ÀS RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

RÉPLICA A ESTAS RESPOSTAS COM NOVE ANEXOS E CARTAS DE AUTORIDADES EM SAÚDE:


http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=108

Observação: Na audiência da CPI do Tráfico de Órgãos, no dia 23 de junho de 2004, da qual participamos, o Relator da Câmara Técnica Brasileira da Morte Encefálica, membro da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia e um dos autores da Resolução 1.480/97, que estabelece os critérios declaratórios da morte encefálica no Brasil para fins de retirada de órgãos para transplantação, Dr. Luiz Alcides Manreza, estando sob compromisso em seu depoimento, declarou que esta carta do Dr. César Timo-Iaria “não foi considerada pelo CFM porque ele não era médico”. Não é verdade: O Dr. Timo-Iaria é médico, neurologista e membro fundador honorário da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia a qual pertence tanto o Dr. Manreza como o grupo de médicos a quem o CFM recorreu para tentar responder ao questionamento neurológico que estava feito por interpelantes desde junho de 2000.  Não é possível admitir que Luiz Alcides Manreza desconhecesse que o Dr. César era membro fundador honorário da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia.


Celso Galli Coimbra, OABRS 11352 – cgcoimbra@gmail.com

Dr. César Timo-Iaria
São Paulo SP, Brasil
15 de fevereiro de 2004

Conselho Federal de Medicina
Brasília DF
Senhores Conselheiros:

Sou médico, já fui neurologista e sou professor titular de Fisiologia (aposentado) da Universidade de São Paulo. Ensinei e pesquisei em Fisiologia do sistema nervoso durante 51 anos. Já fui professor da State University of New York duas vezes e ministrei mais de 200 conferências no Brasil e cerca de 20 no exterior, incluindo Argentina, Uruguai, Chile, México, Estados Unidos, Escócia, Israel, Alemanha e Itália. Fui presidente da Sociedade Brasileira de Fisiologia, da Sociedade Brasileira de Sono e da Asociación Latinoamericana de Ciências Fisiológicas. Sou presentemente membro honorário da Academia de Medicina de São Paulo e da Sociedade Brasileira de Sono e membro fundador e honorário da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia, membro da Academia Brasileira de Ciências e membro emérito da American Physiological Society. Sou, por conseguinte, físiologista de reconhecido valor no Brasil e em âmbito internacional.

Por intermédio do prof. Cícero Galli Coimbra, um dos mais importantes neurologistas brasileiros, fiquei sabendo há algum tempo de um conflito relacionado com um problema médico muito sério, a retirada de órgãos de pessoas tidas como em “morte cerebral”.

Começando pelo nome, que é errado, estou preocupado com o fato de o problema estar apenas nas mãos de clínicos e cirurgiões e não se convoquem físiologistas muito sérios e competentes para auxiliar no esclarecimento desse problema.

Pesquisas de um grupo de médicos japoneses revelaram que em pacientes com a tal “morte cerebral” a hipófise está secretando muito bem seus hormônios, o que significa que o hipotálamo e a área preóptica estão funcionando. Talvez o mais extraordinário caso a levar em consideração seja o do grande físico russo Lev Landau, que em 1962 sofreu um grave acidente de carro e ficou internado em estado muito grave. O governo russo convocou neurologistas dos principais países do mundo e todos o deram por morto.

Quando esses médicos voltaram a seus países a esposa de Lev Landau solicitou às autoridades que não desligassem o respirador. Resultado: em novembro desse mesmo ano Landau foi a Estocolmo receber o Prêmio Nobel de Física e voltou a dar aulas na Universidade de Moscou, embora com limitações.

Os principais neurologistas do mundo se enganaram redondamente com o prognóstico e a viabilidade de Landau e se houvessem desligado o respirador um grande físico teria morrido injustamente, sem dúvida por incompetência médica. Quando li um livro sobre o caso de Lev Landau pensei: “Se se tratasse de um paciente qualquer, um operário, ele teria sido sacrificado, indubitavelmente. Que injustiça! E se fosse meu pai?”.

Se a justificativa para submeter ao discutível teste de apnéia os pacientes com “morte cerebral” fosse que talvez eles ficassem em estado péssimo depois de recuperados eu até concordaria que se apressasse sua morte e retirassem os órgãos para transplantes, pois gostaria que fizessem isso comigo se fosse o caso. Dizer, entretanto, que eles estão mortos sem se realizarem muitos testes que permitissem avaliar sua viabilidade de forma muito ampla é para mim inaceitável. Acho, por exemplo, que se deveriam fazer testes para avaliar os reflexos dos baroceptores e dos quimioceptores; dever-se-ia dosar os hormônios hipofisários circulantes, o fluxo sanguíneo em vários territórios etc.


Lembremos que a administração de solução hipertônica de NaCI recupera pacientes com choque hemorrágico dado como irreversível (descoberta de um clínico-físiologista brasileiro); nos Estados Unidos as ambulâncias, presentemente, carregam solução hipertônica para aplicação imediata em caso de choque irreversível (o que, inacreditavelmente, não ocorre no Brasil). Eu “ressuscitei” três gatos que, durante experimentos que fiz, estavam aparentemente mortos, administrando-lhes solução hipertônica. Acho que o médico que fez essa extraordinária descoberta (Prof. Irineu Velasco) deveria ser convocado para ajudar a criar testes para se fazer o diagnóstico correto dos pacientes em “morte cerebral”.

Vale a pena recordar aqui que um fisiologista japonês retirou os encéfalos de gatos e os manteve congelados durante 7 anos e depois os perfundiu com soluções especiais e conseguiu, após esse tempo de separação do corpo, registrar potenciais evocados e até um verdadeiro alerta eletrofísiológico dos encéfalos.


Penso que em vez de se tratarem os pacientes com “morte cerebral” como atualmente se faz, os médicos deveriam buscar avidamente meios de toma-los viáveis, de ressuscitá-los. Só quando uma bateria de testes mostrasse que seus organismos não mais pudessem ser ativados é que se justificaria retirar-lhes os órgãos.


Afinal, essa é a missão dos médicos.

Sem mais, subscrevo-me, César Timo-Iaria Professor titular de Fisiologia

Outras referências sobre o mesmo assunto:

Artigo publicado na Revista Ciência Hoje, número 161

Expressamente proíbida a reprodução deste artigo em qualquer publicação eletrônica ou não.

Endereço deste artigo neste espaço:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/08/falhas-no-diagnostico-de-morte-encefalica-valor-terapeutico-da-hipotermia/

Editorial da Revista Ciência Hoje, número 161:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/editoriais-morte-encefalica/page/3/

Artigo original: https://biodireitomedicina.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/revista-ciencia_hoje-morte-encefalica.pdf

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/editoriais-morte-encefalica/page/2/

Editorial da Revista dos Anestesistas do Royal College of Anaesthetists da Inglaterra, de maio de 2000:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/05/transplantes-revista-dos-anestesistas-recomenda-em-editorial-realizacao-de-anestesia-geral-nos-doadores-para-que-nao-sintam-dor-durante-a-retirada-de-seus-orgaos-se-estao-mortos-para-que-a-recomend/

Leia também no site da UNIFESP:

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/apnea.htm

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/mortencefalica.htm

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/brdeath.html

http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/opinioes.htm

Revista de Neurociência da UNIFESP, de agosto de 1998:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/04/morte-encefalica-um-diagnostico-agonizante-artigo-de-0898-da-revista-de-neurociencia-da-unifesp/

Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research (1999) 32: 1479-1487 ISSN 0100-879X – “Implications of ischemic penumbra for the diagnosis of brain death”:

http://www.scielo.br/pdf/bjmbr/v32n12/3633m.pdf

Revista BMJ – British Medical Journal – debate internacional onde não foi demonstrada a validade dos critérios declaratóricos de morte vigentes:

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/320/7244/1266

Morte encefálica: o teste da apnéia somente é feito se houver a intenção de matar o paciente

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/11/morte-encefalica-o-teste-da-apneia-somente-e-feito-se-houver-a-intencao-de-matar-o-paciente/

Morte encefálica: carta do Professor Flavio Lewgoy

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/3/

A morte encefálica é uma invenção recente

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/4/

Morte encefálica: A honestidade é a melhor política

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/5/

Morte encefálica: O temor tem fundamento na razão

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/page/6/

Referências correlacionadas:

QUESTIONAMENTO INTERPELATÓRIO AO CFM:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=149

INTRODUÇÃO ÀS RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=150

RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=151

RÉPLICA A ESTAS RESPOSTAS COM NOVE ANEXOS E CARTAS DE AUTORIDADES EM SAÚDE:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=108

A change of heart and a change of mind? Technology and the redefinition of death in 1968

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VBF-3SWVHNF-R&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=45715d0a00629ba39456d22a891613e6

Morte encefálica: o teste da apnéia somente é feito se houver a intenção de matar o paciente

Assista:
__

Vedada a reprodução desta Carta e destes comentários. O endereço para localização, citação ou referência neste espaço é o que segue e deve ser link ativo:

https://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/01/11/morte-encefalica-o-teste-da-apneia-somente-e-feito-se-houver-a-intencao-de-matar-o-paciente/

e em www.biodireito-medicina.com.br é

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/cartas.asp?idCarta=150

O protocolo da Morte Encefálica está na Resolução 1.480/97 do Conselho Federal de Medicina determina a realização do teste da apnéia para a realização deste “diagnóstico”, antes dos exames confirmatórios ali também previstos por último. O teste da apnéia consiste em desligar o respirador do paciente em traumatismo encefálico severo por 10 minutos.

O próprio Conselho Federal de Medicina, em debate travado na Assembléia Legislativa do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul do qual participamos também, representado pelo Presidente da Câmara Técnica Brasileira da Morte Encefálica, em maio de 2003, reconheceu que a declaração de morte que está em sua Resolução 1.480/97 é dogmática e que se não fosse dogmática não poderia ser utilizada para declarar a morte encefálica.

Em declaração para uso público e judicial enviado ao Brasil, o Dr. Walt Weaver, ex-transplantador, deixa claro que o teste da apnéia somente é feito se houver a intenção de matar o paciente por razões ulteriores.

Este documento foi também protocolado em procedimento aberto via Interpelação Judicial junto ao Ministério Público Federal com a Réplica às respostas do CFM sobre o teste da apnéia. A Carta do Dr. Walt Weaver foi traduzida por tradutor público.

Celso Galli Coimbra – OABRS 11352 – cgcoimbra@gmail.com

Referências correlacionadas a esta carta:

QUESTIONAMENTO INTERPELATÓRIO AO CFM:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=149

INTRODUÇÃO ÀS RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=150

RESPOSTAS DO CONSELHO FEDERAL DE MEDICINA:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=151

RÉPLICA A ESTAS RESPOSTAS COM NOVE ANEXOS E CARTAS DE AUTORIDADES EM SAÚDE:

http://www.biodireito-medicina.com.br/website/internas/ministerio.asp?idMinisterio=108

***

WALT F. WEAVER, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Cardiology; Medical Ethics

2111 Heritage Pines Ct.

Lincoln, NE 68506

(402) 484-7512

27 de Janeiro de 2004

Para o Dr. Cicero Galli Coimbra

São Paulo – SP – Brasil

CEP 04040-002

Dr. Coimbra:

Na condição de ex-cardiologista transplantador, chamou-me a atenção o fato de que há aqueles que aparentemente discordam da sua posição sobre o emprego do teste da apnéia em pacientes com lesão encefálica. Meu conjunto de diapositivos montado para 3 conferências a serem apresentadas nos próximos 2 meses contém, tal como sustento há 7 anos, as 2 declarações que se seguem:

O teste da apnéia:

Um teste de estresse para o encéfalo destinado a avaliar a lesão encefálica aguda. No entanto, o teste por si mesmo provoca acentuação da lesão no tecido encefálico já compromentido.

Uma analogia com outro órgão vital:

Nós jamais executaríamos um teste da apnéia ou qualquer outro teste de estresse durante a fase aguda de um infarto miocárdioco (ataque cardíaco) pois ele poderia provocar a acentuação da lesão ao tecido cardíaco já comprometido (a menos que quiséssemos ter o paciente morto por razões ulteriores).

O oxigênio e sua distribuição ao corpo é parte integrante dos nossos sistemas e tecnologias de suporte à vida. Todos os nossos órgãos vitais incluindo o encéfalo, o coração, o pâncreas, o fígado, etc. são vulneráveis à reduzida oferta de oxigênio, especialmente na presença de uma lesão recente.

Em minha opinião, se o paciente não se encontra já em “morte encefálica” de acordo com uma multiplicidade de critérios, as repetidas agressões determinadas por baixos níveis de oxigênio (o teste da apnéia) irão finalmente causar lesão suficiente para declarar-se a morte através do conceito conhecido como “morte encefálica.”

É especialmente interessante que o código para “morte encefálica” sequer existe na Classificação Internacional de Doenças (CID). Alguns têm se referido à ela como elaboração, conceito, estado, mas não aparece em atestados de óbito nos EUA. Essa manipulação para provocar a “morte encefálica” ofende meu senso de comportamento ético.

Obrigado por defender a verdade no desempenho de seu papel como um cientista ético e respeitado. Gostaria de poder conhecê-lo algum dia.

Sinceramente,

Walt F. Weaver, médico

Resumido Curriculum Vitae anexo.

%d blogueiros gostam disto: